Time to Go Long

After shooting at 20 meters for months it is refreshing to start 50-meter practice.  The next competition for me is not until May.  In May that event is the Georgia Cup.

50-meters

There are other tournament, like the NFAA Nationals in Cincinnati, Ohio and the Arizona Cup, but I’ll skip those events.  They both represent a huge expense for little reward.

There are 3D shoots but 3D probably isn’t going to be a major discipline for me in 2019. Certainly, 3D is enjoyable and I was looking forward to at a minimum the Georgia ASA State Championship.  Being bow poor, having one for skinny arrows only, it seems like a waste of time to train then compete against fat arrows.  Additionally, I’ve e heard that in Georgia archers who compete in the State Championship must complete two qualifiers.  Georgia is a big State and getting to qualifiers can be expensive.

Still there’s a pull to shoot in some 3D competitions.  I’ve got an old Mathews Conquest Apex 3 stored in a case; maybe I could bring that out and shoot it for 3D.  I’d sold the bow once and the fellow that bought it gave it back to me.  He said, “Keep this bow and keep the money.”  It is suppose to have been a good bow.

Something may pop-up between now and May, I hope so.  I need to feed my urge to compete.  Worse case, I run a lot of 5ks.

“Your goal should be to have fun.”

Just before the start of the second day of shooting during the USA Indoor National Championships in Suwanee, Georgia a friend of mine said, “Your goal should be to have fun.” That wasn’t my goal.

My goals also weren’t to shoot a specific score. I had only two goals.  One was to “Shoot every arrow right.”

By that, I mean to go through a perfect process for each shot.  When I get it right the arrow lands in the X.  When I’m off the arrow lands in the nine ring.  When the process is out of control – all bets are off.

As far as having fun, that’s an activity that can occur between ends.  Essentially, it amounts to good conversation while waiting to shoot. It helps pass the time of a three and a half hours long tournament.  But, it isn’t why I go to tournaments.

No, I don’t go to archery tournaments to have fun.  I go to compete against other archers.  Oh sure, you’ll say, “You’re there to compete against yourself.”  Well, you can do that at home and save the entry fee expense and whatever other costs you incur to compete.

I go to tournaments to compete.  Tournaments add a competitive layer of archery I don’t get shooting alone.  Yes, I do enjoy it.  I also enjoy the friendly conversation with people I know and ones I don’t know during a tournament.  It is a great way to make friends. Which comes to my second goal, “To make new friend.”

Where my goals are concerned for that last tournament, I feel I was more successful with the second. As far as having fun, tournaments are a lot more fun when you’re winning. In that regard, this last tournament was fun.

Changing Bows Before a Big Tournament

Last year I purchased a bow specifically for target shooting.  During practices I’ve had some decent scores with the bow.  In tournaments, it has been another story.

Yesterday, during practice, using the target bow, I wasn’t shooting badly.  However, I wasn’t shooting what I felt was going to reach my average score.  I stopped shooting, took the sight, scope, and stabilizers off the target bow and out it on my 3D bow.

I’ve not shot the 3D bow too often since last year and it took a few ends to get the feel of it with the longer stabilizers.  After practice I compared the scores.  The non-target bow ended up scoring 5 points higher.  While that might not be statistically significant, it could be extremely important in an archery tournament.  I’ve lost more tournaments by a point than I care to think about. Heck, I’ve lost three with the same points as the winner. Twice I had the same X-count as the winner as well. Of those, I ended up losing by a one by a single arrow closest to the center shoot off. Another time I lost to the inner X count, and once to a one-arrow X margin.  Those were hard loses.

Thus far, in tournaments, I’ve never set a personal best. In other sports competition is where all my personal bests were established.  Adrenaline may help in running or cycling, but it isn’t a friend to the archer.  In archery, anything than can help to reduce excitement and calm the performer can be a benefit.  Maybe going with a different bow that feels a little trustworthier will help over the next two days.

I suppose I know pretty soon.

Another Tough Tournament Done

Coming into the Georgia Bowhunter and Archery Association/NFAA Sectional I felt it would be a tight contest. I expected podium places would often come down to the X count and even the inner X.  I was right.

I heard the official talking as they were tallying the scores.  One commented that, “I think scores like this should be settled by a shoot-off rather than the inner X count.”

I’d gathered at two archers had scored the same points for a 1stplace finish and had the same number of Xs.  Choosing the winner was going to come down to the inner X count. Essentially, which archer’s Xs were, by a judgment call, closer to the center based on how a group counted the center or inner Xs. Little did I know.

For the second tournament in two weeks I’m busted down a level based on Xs.  Well, in this case, the inner Xs.  My score and the ultimate winner’s score were the same, our X count, the same and while the inner X score wasn’t posted, I must assume he had more inner Xs than me –it would have taken only one. (A measurement of less than a millimeter would do it). It is a hard way to lose.

No points separated the 1stand 2ndplace (or Xs) and only one point between that score and 3rd.  It was tight.

Georgia Bowhunter and Archery Association / NFAA Sectionals

Day 1: Things where going really well.  Then, they weren’t.

If you are unfamiliar with an NFAA Indoor competition in archery, archers standing 20 yards away, shoot at 5 targets per end. In other words, archers shoot 5 arrows, stop, wait, score, wait some more, shoot 5 more arrows, and repeat until 60 arrows have been shot.  For two lines of archers that takes about three and a half hours. Oh, then all of it is repeated the next day.

This is what a 5-spot looks like. Well trained arrows should stick into the target in this manner.

The maximum score is 300 hundred points per day in this type of tournament. 300 isn’t an uncommon score. Winning typically comes down to the X count.  And, the X count is often divided into inner X versus outer X. The arrow landing inside the middle of the X ring and not touching the outer edge of the X ring counts as an inner X and is scored by putting a circle around the X on the scorecard. Sometimes, the scores are the same, the X count is the same and the winner is decided from the count of those inner Xs (The archer coming closest to the exact center more often than the opponent.)

I was rolling along heading for a 300 when this arrow seemingly decided to shoot itself.  Now, that happens a good bit with me and today was no different.  All the other times those independently acting arrows ended up in a good place. But, this one time, well the arrow being somewhat new remains untrained and I lost a point.  Believe me, 299 is not the score I was aiming for.

Of course, I had about 15 more arrows to shoot when the “event” occurred.  And sure enough everything was fine after that occurrence.  Yep, in archery one mistake can screw up your entire day.

Archery: 10% mental and 90% trying not to quit.

 

Another archery tournament, another road trip.  

Traveling to archery competitions can be rough when staying in a hotel.  Making the trip using a camper and staying at a State Park is significantly better. At the moment, I’m camped at the George L. Smith State Park in Twin City, Georgia.

The park is about 45 minutes from Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Georgia.  That’s where this weekend’s shoot is taking place. There was a tournament at GSU two weeks ago and I stayed at a hotel for that event.  The hotel was nice, one of the Hilton properties, but it was still a box.

The tournament tomorrow and Sunday is an indoor 5-spot State Championship and NFAA Sectional.  I know the folks I’ll be shooting against.  I expect any score outside of 300 per day will fail to make it to the top.  This tournament will likely come down to X count and maybe even inner Xs versus outer Xs.

Whether I finish on the podium or not, what I can say is this Georgia State Park makes the trip worthwhile.

First 3D of 2019

Saturday was cold enough for a 3D competition.  It was 43°F and a little windy.  I’d debated whether to shoot the 3D event or run a 5K.  3D won because I forgot to enter the race.

Trying to keep my hands warm

The 3D course was excellent. The targets were thoughtfully placed.  But, I’m yet to find a group to consistently shoot with during a 3D tournament here in Georgia.  So, I ended up shooting alone and doing the fun shoot because I had no scoring partners. I can do that on my property.

You can guess what’s out there..
It is an unwritten rule, no javelina less that 30 yards.

There was another fellow shooting alone and I thought about joining with him.  As I approached, I read his body language and decided against asking.  It is almost always awkward to ask, “Can I shoot with you?”  So, I shot for fun.

The trees lining this, the larger ones are easy to see, but there are also smaller ones that make this 35 yard target fun
Really fun shot

That fellow did speak to me once.  We were one adjacent targets.  I was looking for the animal.  Speaking from recent experience he said, “There!” while pointing an arrow at the target for which I’d been searching.  I replied with equal vocal conservation, “Thanks!”

Indeed, the course was fun. It was nice to shoot a course where the animals are not all sitting at the end of a straight open corridor as far away as possible.  It makes the shots more interesting.

It didn’t take long to score, pull and move on.

I shot in the hunter class. After the shot I recorded the distance. The average target was at 32 yards with the shortest at 21 yards and the longest in that class at 43 yards.

43 yards is getting back there for pins. For me it meant an 8 just off the 10 line

During the time on the range it began to sleet a little.  The wind picked up a little and it remained cold.  As the morning progressed more people arrived.  By the time I was at target 15 there was another group of 4 shooting behind me at target 4.  One of those archers was wearing short pants.  Beyond that fact, you can draw your own conclusions.

Yep, those are short pants

I did ask him, “Why are you wearing shorts in this weather?” He said, “I wear shorts unless the temperature gets down into the 20s.”  He added, “I don’t like the way long pants feel.”

I left the range a little disappointed.  I didn’t shoot the score I’d hoped ending up with a 191.  It could have been worse.  While in flight two arrows lost vanes and went forward a tad on the wobbly side. One flew left hitting an eight and the other when high and left landing a five.  In addition, I earned three more 8s, and only two 12s to compensate. Every other arrow, 12 of them, were 10s. If I’d not been shooting for fun this would have dropped me into second in the hunter class, the top score being 202.

Twice, really, twice?

Shooting 3D in 2019 is beginning to look as if it will only be done for fun.  With the Georgia ASA requiring two qualifying tournaments to shoot the State ASA 3D I’ll probably not fool with it.  It comes down to not enough reward for the money and time to meet the addition qualification requirements.  That, and I don’t think there’s a reason to qualify twice. (If this is incorrect, maybe someone will let me know)

Thanks to the folks at Social Circle Ace for putting out a great range!

Getting a Little Rest

Ever get that really tired feeling?  You know, you feel like you need a good long rest?

Well, sir, that is exactly where I am today.  Monday is typically an easy day for training.  Sunday, if I’m not in a tournament, is my official rest day. This week I am taking off Sunday and Monday. That is except for the morning run. Aside from that run no other exercise.  I didn’t touch a bow.

If you shoot over 36,000 arrows a year, run over 1000 miles, ride a bike over 5000 miles and head to the gym 78 times in a year, occasionally it catches up with you.  While this may sound like a lot, the running and cycling are small potatoes compared to what I was doing before I picked up a bow.

Coaching Tip

Here’s what I know, as I’ve aged it take me longer to recover and rest is good. There’s a time to listen to your body and amend a training plan.  Don’t abandon the plan, but a small adjustment may be dividends later.

Louis Garneau Apparel

From the drawer where I keep riding shorts these surfaced for today.  I wore them while riding this afternoon. They’re about 27 years old.

27 years old and still holding up.

Granted, I have lots of riding shorts.  Even so, I wear them once before washing.  If I ride twice a day, that means two pair of shorts per day. I go through a lot of riding shorts.

The brand of these shorts is Louis Garneau.  I’ve worn his brand since the mid-80s (yes the 1980s)  when Nestor Gernay would order our cycling team kits from Louis Garneau.  When we put together cycling kits for the Healthdyne Technologies Cycling Team in the 90’s I ordered them from Louis Garneau.  These are those shorts.

Nestor Gernay and me (in the red jersey). Winter time training in Savannah, GA around 2000.

Now, Louis Garneau may or may not make shirts for archery.  What I do know is that his apparel lasts.