Waiting for the Dust to Settle

I’ve not picked up a bow in weeks.  It has been a good time to accept an unplanned recovery.  It has also been time to repair targets and clean the range.

Keeping the lanes clear

I did a 3D tournament in June.  The Covid-19 social distancing wasn’t strictly followed.  I planned to continue competing but put that plan aside until the dust has settled a bit.

Over the Memorial Day weekend we didn’t head out into crowds of carefree people.  I predicted we’d see a spike post-Memorial Day and we did.  I expect the increases we continue to see are associated with Memorial Day and protests.

I’m 65 and in good health.  I expect if I get Covid-19 my symptoms would be mild.  In fact, I’d not be surprised to find I have the antibodies found among people that have been exposed to Covid-19 and not had more severe symptoms.  I don’t know because I’m not paying $300.00 to find out.

While I wait for less contagious times I continue to prepare.  There is a State Championship in August but that one might be a skip.  Still, I’ll restart practice in a few days in the event the August date appears safe – which I don’t expect.

The deer enjoy the range at night

I will mention this – running and cycling have been going really well.  And you can bet my range looks nice.

Range Maintenance

Some folks have been flinging arrows right and left in large groups.  I decided to hold back the jumping into crowds a bit longer than others.  It seems that the next archery event being considered doesn’t occur until August. Nevertheless, practice continues.

With practice comes range maintenance.  There are weeds to control, grass to cut and insects that get sprayed.

It isn’t hard work and the reward is worth the effort.

You Get What You Pay For

Working through the Georgia process to reinstate my respiratory care practitioner license I’ve been digging around for free Continuing Education Units (CEUs).  I need 30 to submit as part of my reinstatement.

The paid CEU hours seem to run around $15.00 per hour and $7.50 per hours at the American Association for Respiratory Care’s website.  The discounted hours, $7.50, would run me $225.00 to complete the 30 hours.  That fee along with the Georgia reinstatement fee of $400.00 and the Georgia fee to verify my National Boards for Respirator Care credential, $5.00, winds up to be $630.00.  So, you can imagine, I’m doing what I can to keep the cost down.

The first few credits, all free, went well and I exhausted the hours offered on the site where I was harvesting for hours.  The next site got me running, I got past the course material then got caught in some loop of infinite wonder.  There was no way it seemed to complete the program.  I gave up and moved onto the next free class.

This class was written by guys I know well having worked with them for decades.  The course presented one slide, which seemed weird.  There was downloadable material so I downloaded and read their text.

When I tried to take the quiz I was only offered two questions.  I needed to make a 70% to pass.  Problem is that there are actually 15 questions on the final quiz.  I couldn’t get the final 13 questions to appear.  I’d answer questions one and two then get my results, 2 out of 15 correct without even seeing questions 3 through 15.

I was able to make two attempts before become barred from further efforts to make the remaining questions appear.

Even though the past two courses didn’t eat any cash, they were a waste of time. I suppose you can’t expect too much for free.