A Small Victory

The Georgia State / USA Archery Indoor 18-meter Championship where I competed, at Georgia Southern University, wasn’t too bad.  I didn’t win.  I ended in 3rd Place among the Senior Men’s category shooting an Olympic Recurve.

For those that don’t follow archery, men’s senior is 21 – 49 years of age.  If I’d entered using my age group allowance I’d been in the Master’s 60+ class. I’ve competed in both age groups shooting compound bow.

At Georgia Southern everyone inside the Georgia Southern Shooting Sports Education Center is required to wear a mask, a precaution against spreading the Covid-19 virus.  Since I am approaching 66 years old, a high risk group, shooting where masks are being worn seemed a better choice that the other location in Georgia where the competition was being held.

Some archers feel that a mask interferes with that shooting.  I don’t think wearing a mask is much of a problem.  Catching Covid-19 has a greater risk of being a problem and dropping a few points in archery because the mask got hung up in a bowstring.

Taking a 3rd place during a pandemic is just fine by me.  I am happy to be able to fine a safe environment where I can go play.

Taper

In nine days I’ll be heading to the Georgia State and USA Archery Indoor Championships. At the moment I am shooting like crap.

Over the past week or so my practice scores have been decreasing.  The volume of practice has been high.  Obviously, fatigue (hopefully) is a symptom of reaching a point of diminishing returns.

A friend of mine is an ex-pro golfer. He once said not to go into a tournament tired.

From past sport experience I understand that excessive fatigue can impact quality of performance.

With that in mind I’ve dropped my daily arrow count o 140 arrows broken into two practice sessions.  Still my scores aren’t competitive.  However, they are creeping up, again.

This afternoon during the 4th quarter of my practices my groups began getting tighter.  I’d jumped from 8.45 points per arrow to 8.8 points per arrow. Then, on the final five ends the average increased to 9.125, closer to where I expect to be shooting at this point with my recurve.

It was hard to stop shooting, but to continue deviated from the plan.  There’s nine days left before I hit the road for the tournaments.  That is a realistic taper.

Since I began shooting an Olympic recurve 186 days ago I’ve taken 49 days for compete recovery.  I understand that shooting a recurve isn’t something that can be picked up over night.  Still, I’ve managed, starting with a lower volume of arrows per day and working my way up, to shoot 16,728 arrows. That’s an overall average of 122 arrows per day.  I’d peaked at 1000 arrows per week but have now dropped to 700 (allow two days break per week at this point) per week.

It feels like a huge drop in volume.  I hope it works.

I am runner and not afraid

I’ve been a runner all my life.  Nike had an ad that read, “Athletes Run.” I’ve done and still do a lot of athletics.  So, I still run.  Runner’s World, a periodical, sends me their magazine.  I look forward tor receiving it.

What I find is the magazine is primarily a long list of printed commercials.  I rarely see any new gizmo that I’d purchase.  There is often a pearl or two in an issue of Runner’s World.  Along with those pearls there is some really dumb advertising.

Now, you know Runner’s World doesn’t produce the content of an ad. They accept payment and run the ad.

In the current edition, Volume 56 Number 1 on page 21 there is an ad for CBD oil to relieve pain.  I was interested and read the ad.  In the third paragraph, last line, in association with comments referring to the amount of CBD on a product’s label and the amount contained in the product the writer explains there may be differences.  In such that the amount of CBD oil on the label was not the amount in the product 70% of the time. There was no further explanation.

This might mean that the variance is 1% of 10%.  It wasn’t quantified. But, what caught my attention was sentence on the subject, “And, as a consumer, that’s terrifying!” (Exclamation included in the text)

Reading those words I shook my head.  Clearly, the marketing communication group that came up with the ad was void of anyone that had ever experience terror. If this causes someone to be terrorized they probably need to remain behind locked doors.

Curious, I looked further into the terrifying claim:

US Pharmacopeia and emerging standards from medicinal cannabis industry leaders, a ±10% allowable variance was used for product labeling (ie, accurately labeled = 90%-110% labeled value, underlabeled >110% labeled value, and overlabeled <90% labeled value).(1)

Research that tested CBD oil found the mean variance was 10.34: and the median was 2.76%.  (1)

When I’d  finished reading the ad I had remained calm.  I completed my paper work, flushed and moved forward with the day.

Reference:

(1) Marcel O. Bonn-Miller, PhD,1 Mallory J. E. Loflin, PhD,2 Brian F. Thomas, PhD,3 Jahan P. Marcu, PhD,4 Travis Hyke, MS,5 and Ryan Vandrey, PhD, Labeling Accuracy of Cannabidiol Extracts Sold Online. JAMA. 2017 Nov 7; 318(17): 1708–1709.

Published online 2017 Nov 7. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11909

 

 

 

That Was Awful

It was 37°F when I practiced this morning.  Cold by my standards.  The cold was something the wind was something else.

The wind was blowing so bad, gusts up to 30 mph, that it blew out my ‘Mr. Heater’ outdoor propane heater, repeatedly.  I’d see arrows kick their fletched end when caught by a gust – at 18 meters!

For the afternoon practice it had warmed to 39°F.  To compensate with the warmth the wind picked up.

When I came inside from practice my wife felt my hands.  She then said, “You must have wanted to shoot pretty bad.”