A Few Pearls You Already Know

Don’t Blow It

You’ve practiced, you’re ready, but during 3D competition you blow it. Here are a few pearls that may help you to not blow it.

We’ve all been there. That place where we botch a shot. From time to time I revisit ‘there.’ So, rather than return to ‘there’ more often than necessary set up practices to find the mistakes that could that lead you back ‘there.’

For those of you that left ‘there’ and never returned my hat is off to you. Some of us make mistakes when shooting 3D that result in lost points or lost arrows.

About losing arrows – don’t be afraid to lose them during practice. While practicing it isn’t a bad idea to push your limits. Doing so is going to cause a miss. Better to miss while in practice than during competition. When you do find a particular shot that is off course do it over and over until you get it. Then, do it some more.

Working long shots. Practicing at 50 yards (known) may help me do better at 40 yards.

Aside from judging yardage, which is another matter, there are things than you can do to help make that shot. For baseline, we’ll pretend you always judge yardage smack on. We’ll also agree that you are a practiced and proficient archer that on occasion messes up a little.

Practicing from 50 yards then moving up to 40 yards. (Known distance practice)

Here are a few pearls that are simple things to remember that can help you 3D competition.

First, unless you’re one of those top gun archery celebrities, almost no one is watching you shoot. Sure, you’re at the stake standing isolated at the stake for everyone to see, but they are either watching the target, eating a Little Debbie snack, talking, daydreaming, or worrying about their own score. Relax and don’t let your egocentric imagination go wild. Stay calm, relax and shoot an arrow.

When you’re not shooting take that time to study the shot. Before you reach the stake have a mental plan of how to solve the shot. Say, for example, your target is half of a javelina exposed from behind a tree at 40 yards. Of course, the center shot for a 10 (ASA scoring) is inches away from the tree.

First off the tree is a bonus. It provides a linear boarder. Aim so that the tree provides a black line, the part of the javelina exposed, between the tree and the X. The shoot the X.

Next, make certain you don’t screw up your shot. If you push or pull and arrow, depending on whether you are right or left handed you are going to hit the tree next to that javelina.

To avoid that catastrophe remain clam, take you time (you of plenty) and do what so many neglect, follow through with the shot. You’d be surprised at how often archers get rushed and don’t follow through. Heck, don’t take your aim off the target until you hear your arrow hit and then hold some. If you got the yardage right you’ll be fine. If your elevation is good but your arrow landed right or left, well you messed up your shot. You probably didn’t follow though or rushed the shot and pushed your arrow. (Assuming your form is good most of the time and your not torqueing your bow and punching your release. Oh, you can punch a hinge. Just try snapping your wrist back to activate the hinge.)

Don’t rush. Take your allotted time. That doesn’t mean walk up to the stake and fire up a cigarette (I’ve seen it). Start taking time before you approach the target. Take time to judge yardage. Notice where the other arrows have hit (if you are not the first shooter) and see if the other arrows are going to highlight the point where you want to place your shot. In archery, slow is good.

This is an easy pearl for archers – eat. So much of archery is governed by the brain that keeping it supplied with energy is critical for a long tournament. The brain’s primary source of energy is carbohydrates. Take sometime to eat, beef jerky is not a carbohydrates, to provide the carbs your brain wants and stay hydrated. (I have nearly bonked during long tournaments. I know on those times I lost points by not paying attention on my calorie needs. Archery has demands other than those experienced in long distance running, cycling or triathlon. Nevertheless, if you get hungry during a tournament your shooting will suffer.)

The ‘lesser’ practice range at the lake.

None of these little pearls should be new to you. You know them and sometimes you (and I) forget them. When you practice pay attention to these little pearls and your scores will reflect the effort you made to improve your shooting.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.