Practice is harder than tournaments.

Coaching Tip

By the time you reach tournament play you should be ready. You should understand how you’ll perform and not expect miracles. You should be confident in your ability to execute at the level of your practice.

Before you enter a tournament you’ve practiced a lot.  In addition you’ve added fitness training and stuck to your plan.  It takes a lot of effort, time, and determination.

In archery it means lots of arrows, lots of targets, weight lifting and cardio work.  Aside from being able to put an arrow in the center of a target you need to be fit enough and strong enough to maintain a center shot for dozens if not hundreds of arrows.  Not everyone has mastered this skill set.  In fact, perfect scores are rare events.

If your practice is basically heading to the range three or four times a week and shooting 30 to 60 arrows you can become accomplished, but you won’t reach the peak level of elite archers.  You’ll have fun and be good at the sport of archery.  But, you’ll not be on the podium at the major tournaments.

Practice is hard. Shooting arrows isn’t hard.  Sure, your arms will fatigue and you’ll feel good about having shot a few dozen arrows.  Practice on the other hand should have purpose.

For example, before a practice considers what it is you need to work on for that session.  Say, your timing at the point of release isn’t perfect. Design a practice, or have your coach do so, that focuses on your release.  Then, do the concentrated effort until you no longer get it wrong.

As you prepare keep a record of your performance.  Prior to a tournament, plan to practice the tournament.  Have a timer set to the allotted time allowed to shoot an end. Slow down between ends.  This is going to keep you on the range longer but it will allow to create a mental image of the delay between ends at an actual event. Have music playing, such as they do at many events and record your scores.

You don’t need to do this everyday but add it to your practice.  Overtime you’ll learn what to expect from your ability.  In other words, if you average 570 points out of 600 it isn’t likely you’ll show up on the ‘big’ day and fire off a 600.  If your statistical range of tournament practice is 560 – 580 during a tournament you’ll probably score around 558 – 588 or so depending on your standard deviations.

Doing your practices with a purpose, following a complete plan for archery fitness, and understanding where you are in your ability will help prepare you for a tournament.  Doing the hard work before you show up will make competition feel easy and fun.

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