The More I Look Into the Current Use of PEDs in Sports the More Amazing

If you have read many of my post you may know that I don’t like competing against dopers. A lot of work that goes into training to be competitive in any sport. It seems unreasonable that there are still people trying to win by using performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs).

In cycling doping remains too much a part of the game. You’d think mature athletes not competing for prize money wouldn’t bother with PEDS. Sadly, non-professional cyclists as well as amateur multi-sport athletes are using PEDs to the tune of about 25% of the competitors. Consider for a minute that one in four people that you are competing against is taking an unfair, not to mention illegal, advantage over you. In archery, initially it did not occur to me that there were dopers. I was mistaken.

Among the druggiest Olympic sports, there are 57 sports in the Olympics (combined Winter and Summer Games), archery ranks as the 10th druggiest. The athletes that get away with doping the most are Masters athletes.

Those athletes that have been caught have their shame posted by WADA and the USADA. Most of the cheaters had a mean age of 27. The cheating older athletes had a mean age of 42. In one group of Masters athletes 50% confessed to using PEDs. 1

On a number of occasions I have brought up the topic of beta-blocker use during archery competition when associating with Masters archers during competition. The response has consistently been sheepish looks and silence.

Beta-blockers are used to treat hypertension and heart conditions.

Metoprolol is a beta-blocker that treats high blood pressure and heart failure, but it also treats angina and can be used to prevent heart attacks in people who have already had one. Lisinopril and metoprolol are both antihypertensives, the top selling drug class in the U.S. in 2014 with 705 million prescriptions filled. The common brand metoprolol comes as Lopressor, and this drug was dispensed 85 million times last year.2

Beta-blockers are the dope of choice for archers. When you consider 1 out of 3 Americans have hypertension you might not be surprised to learn many of them may be among the archers competing next to you. 3

WADA does have a process whereby an archer may be able to receive a therapeutic exemption to use a beta-blocker. 4 But, it is a process wherein competitive advantage is a consideration. In any case, I doubt NFAA, USA Archery, ASA, or IBO are paying much attention. It’s pretty much, “If you got ’em, smoke ’em.”

1.) http://mtntactical.com/knowledge/peds-tactical-athlete-follow/

2.) http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/06/07/5-most-common-medications-in-us-and-how-to-save-on-them.html

3.) https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@sop/@smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_319587.pdf

4.) https://www.wada-ama.org/sites/default/files/resources/files/wada-tpg-cardiovascular_conditions-1.1.pdf

 

 

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