Boat Races and Good Friends on the Choptank

This past weekend we celebrated Memorial Day with friends in Cambridge, Maryland. We didn’t take the Winnebago; instead we rented a small cottage on Hudson Creek near Cambridge. We spent the days on the Choptank River.

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Brenda’s friends in attendance were mostly associated with education. She was a teacher in Easton, Maryland before she retired. The guys I hung out with were a mix of athletes, businessmen, and medical professionals. The conversation was something I miss at times living so remotely here in North Carolina.

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This was also the weekend for the Cambridge Powerboat Races held on the Choptank. These races have been going on for over 100 years. On Saturday, along with our good friends, the Brohawns, on their Boston Whaler, were able to anchor just outside the caution buoys for the races and watch. Seeing boats race at speeds of 100 mph or more is pretty awesome. The fastest I’ve gone on water is 71 mph. It would be pretty cool to add 29 mph more to that 71 mph.

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Naturally, we stopped at Great Marsh Park where the EagleMan Ironman 70.3 race starts and finishes. It’s a really hard race. The current in the swim is always against you, the ride is always windy and the run is always hot. We lived just down the road from the start, so despite the hideous conditions it was always on the list of events for a year.

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Many of the guys at our weekend gathering wanted to know if I was doing any more triathlons or other racing. They know that I am now focused on archery. I explained that I have three triathlons on my calendar for 2016. We also discussed the fitness of other archers; some of them have read my posts here and are aware that archers aren’t the most physically fit athletes.

Looking at those friends, you would not mistake them for being out of shape. Despite them not doing triathlons they are still very active.

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Scenes along the way during morning runs.

Among them are two serious runners. Brad who now lives in New Jersey and is a marathoner and Jimmy who lives in Cambridge and remains a speed demon when it comes to running and is now a running coach.  Joe, is a competitive sailor (he was that before he became a triathlete) and aside from staying physically fit he races and wins with a J30. David B, still rides and runs, but has returned to his sporting roots in tennis. Fred is a long distance cyclist and kayaker. Alan, a physician, has worn out a hip and is having that fixed in a few weeks. He’s already planning post-surgery events. These aren’t all the guys, just a few of them.

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Scenes along the way during morning runs.

I missed seeing Tim. There wasn’t enough time. Tim’s a former triathlete and active shooter (not archery). He’s taught me a lot about shooting that I’ve related to archery.

But, here is what I found very interesting – there were zero war stories during the entire weekend. None, not one of these athletes talked about their “glory” days. That was entirely refreshing. It really becomes tiresome listening to someone talk about how good they once were and I hear it all the time. It’s much more fun to hear about current adventures.

I am happy to hear about what someone did last week. Or listen to an interesting tale about some event or tournament. But, those sagas of past greatness and glory – please.

For the most part, my friends in Maryland are not young men. The mean age is 60. They are all very active. I’d guess their mean body fat % in this group was about 9%. These guys remain extremely fit even if triathlon isn’t the number one sport on their minds. They did take a poke at archers.

They talked a bit about archers who can’t walk from stake to stake without becoming winded or needing to sit down and “catch their breath” before they can shoot. I’ve witnessed walking fatigue in the men’s open, bow hunter, and in the men’s pro hunter classes. I’ve even seen physical exhaustion when an archer couldn’t walk back and forth at 18 meters without a break because of her size.

Here’s an example of archer’s a take on fitness:

“…wondering if the ASA is ever going to take into consideration the distances the senior class shooters have to walk to shoot? ………. I really enjoy shooting the events, but [it] seems to me that the senior class ranges are getting to far for me to walk to shoot. …… I love shooting the ASA events, but please take into consideration the walk distances for the senior folks.”

Granted, health issues can develop that might impact walking. However, the predominate health issue I’ve noticed is obesity in archery.

The guys in Maryland suggested I write a little more about fitness for archers. Believe me, they aren’t fanatics when it comes to fitness. They are pretty normal guys who enjoy sports. With one exception, me, they all still work at their normal jobs. Yet, they all find time for sports.

Archery, like all sports, takes a lot of time if you want to be good. Being fit doesn’t take all that much time. If you are out of shape, you can probably find at least 30 minute a day to begin a program to improve your health. You could probably even find an hour. And you can do this without impacting your archery. One easy place to gain time is to take some time away from television. There’s nothing worth watching anyway.

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Finishing the day at the Cambridge Yacht Club

It was wonderful to spend time with friends. I even thought about buying another home in Cambridge this past weekend. But, then, I can just pull the Winnebago there and spend as much time as I want while saving the cash.

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