Dot-less in NC

Among my problems, specific to shooting a bow, is a lack if vision. No, not the sports psychology commandment to visualize yourself as a 60X Champion. Nope, it’s a matter of not being able to line up the pin I use for aiming under low-light conditions.

Outside a single pin using ambient light absorption to illuminate a monofilament is fine. In 3D, should ambient light fail battery operated light is an excellent back up. But, for 18-meter indoor under, as I understand the USA Archery rules, supplemental light is barred from competition.

At times, for me too many times, indoor ranges where I’ve shot are poorly lighted. Many times, the targets are walled up distal to the overhead fluorescent bulbs humming above leaving them dimly luminous. The result for me is that my aiming pin is a mere shadow. For an experiment, I decided to go back to a dot and see how that worked.

All my dots are orange. I have no idea why I ordered orange. The black dots I once owned have been swallowed into the abyss of missing archery, cycling, running and swimming gear. There’s also a pile of nice sunglasses in that void. I wanted black dots.

During my last trip to Georgia, Steve, the bow technician at Social Circle’s Ace hardware had me shoot one of his bows. His scope was equipped with black dots. Those dots seemed very crisp. The range also had great lighting. Hence, I wanted to try block dots on my scope.

I ordered a package of Precision Archery Scope dots from Lancaster Archery Supply. These are the same brand I’d used in the past. In this package, however, I received dots that refused to adhere to the lens. So, it was back to the single pin and praying for a little luck with light.

(New Black Dots are in the mail!)

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