Finding a workable combination

During the last competitive event I shot the lowest recorded score against a vertical 3-spot, inner 10s, in my life.  The score was 28 points below the six weeks average going into the tournament.  Something was clearly amok.

Naturally, I blamed the bow, an Elite Victory X from 2018.  The bow received the blame because the arrows were landing in similar disarray to the patterns revealed when the bearing in the cams failed.  Months ago, that bow, the 37, was shipped back to Elite for analysis.  They uncovered that the bearing in the cams had failed.  Elite replaced the bearing, returned the bow and it shot fine, again. At least for awhile.

At the 2020 Georgia State Indoor National Championship I suspected that those replaced bearing had again, following around 10,000 shots, bit the dust.  Looking at the cams I could see tiny specks of silver that made me more suspicious. I vowed to never shoot that bow again.

To replace the Victory 37X I tried a 2014 Elite 35.  It didn’t shot a whole lot better.  The fellows at Ace Hardware’s Bow Pro shop took a look at the 35 and went to work straighten it out.  The problem is that with the Elite 35, while I gained 10 points over the Georgia State flop, I was still 18 points below my prior average for 18-meters.

I tried an even older, purchased in 2013 when I started archery, Mathews Conquest Apex 7.  The bow shoots great and is extremely smooth.  The feel, however, is dramatically different from the two Elites and my scores were no better.

Today, shooting all three things remain a mess.  The Elite 35 landed me an average of just 9 points per arrow.  (That is until I noticed a screw missing on the limb pocked. Amazingly, I found it on the ground.) The Mathews was 8.5 points per arrow and the Victory 9.5 points per arrow.

To achieve the 9.5 points per arrow I ended up flinging arrows too stiff for the poundage I shoot.  Using a bare shaft the arrow, an Easton 2318 that has been cut 3 inches and has a 180 grain tip, the shaft shoots to the right.  A bare shaft 2314, uncut, with 100 grain tip shot even further to the right – which is not what I’d expected.

Two days out from the USA Indoor Nationals I am considering just tossing my arrows toward the target.

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