Reviewing Practice

During practice it is a good idea to take notes. A small pad or folding piece of paper is adequate for making notes on shots.

Coaching Tip

I carry a small pad in my quiver on which to record my notes. Here is what I am reviewing from this mornings practice.

First off, today’s morning practice was a mock 3D tournament. This means, in ASA style, 20 targets. There are times when warm up isn’t possible, so to make this practice more complicated I did not take any warm-up shots.

The twenty targets included three bear, three pigs, three turkey, three deer, two javelina, two mountain lions, badger, mosquito, bobcat and a rabbit. All these targets are either small or medium sized.

All targets were shot without the benefit of a range finder. A range finder was used after the shot to compare its measured distance with the distance I selected for the target.

Notes from this morning

The final score was not overwhelming well – 181 or 9.05 points per target. I shot three 5s which need attention. The first 5 was a small black bear at 33 yards. The elevation was fine and the range finder was in agreement with the distance I’d judged. The problem – I rushed the shot and pulled the shot right. The next 5 was a badger at 28 yards (ranger finder 29 yards). The arrow was perfect right to left; I’d judged the yardage well. But, I’d had poor placement of my aim. I attributed this to the early morning lack of light and overcast sky. Perhaps, if I’d approached the shot more slowly I might have had a better score.

The worst 5 was on a target I typically hit in the 10 ring. This was a cinnamon bear at 32 yards. The error was a major, my worst mistake, judgment of distance. I shot it for 38 yards, it was only 32 yards.

I did have 3 twelves. One each on a javelina (26 yards), a deer (30 yards) and a small pig (32 yards.) The other scores were eight 10s and five 8s.

This afternoon I’ll go back to the range and shoot most of these targets again from 20 to 45 yards in 5-yard increments. The very small targets, bobcat and rabbit for example I’ll not shot from over 30 yards because their shooting lane isn’t long enough. But, my notes reveal where I need work. Without the notes I’d be guessing at areas where I need to improve.

Keeping notes doesn’t take much time and reviewing them for weaknesses then working on them is important to improving your scores.

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