“THESE ARROWS COST $47.00 A PIECE!”

I’ve bought a lot of gear from Lancaster Archery. When we lived in Easton, Maryland, where I started shooting a compound bow in November 2013, someone mentioned to me Lancaster Archery.  Until that moment I had no idea they existed.

There isn’t any reason I might have heard of Lancaster Archery Supply.  I’d never been involved with archery so why would I have heard of LAS?

Naturally, I looked LAS up on the Internet.  Those where the days when I lived in a fancy town with actual Internet service.  The year was 2014; I’d been trying to shoot a compound bow, a Mathews Conquest Apex 7 for several months.

Easton is only 110 miles away from LAS.  I’d decided to make a pilgrimage to LAS so my wife and I headed to Lancaster, PA. She wanted to see if there might be some Amish goods to acquire in the area.

What I wanted from LAS was a target sight and scope along with those long stabilizers the other archers all had on their bows.  Up until that point I had a hunting sight and a Trophy Ridge hunting stabilizers on the Apex 7.  I ‘knew’ the fancy gear would improve my shooting and was willing to pay for it. Or at a minimum I’d look the part of an archer taking aim at targets.

With a couple of months experience in archery I entered LAS pretty much not having a clue.  LAS felt like archery Mecca. Within a few minutes my glassy eyed expression signaled for help.

The salesman was extremely patient. He sold me a pile of gear.  I still use the sight and scope on my compound bow.  Well, they are still on my compound bow but I’ve not picked it up since I switched to recurve in 2020. I did change the front stabilizer on the bow after a few years of using it.

While I was in LAS there were other archers milling about. One fellow in particular I’m unlikely to forget.  He wasn’t milling about admiring treasures. They fellow strutted around as if his genital was engorged hoping, perhaps, he’d be admired.

Accompanying him was his recurve bow, quiver lashed to his waist loaded with the skinniest arrows I’d ever sent.  Admittedly, I was curious about the arrows. I wanted to know about the arrows but was afraid to risk speaking to the man for fear he’d erupt on himself he was so puffed up.

When a salesman spoke to him it took a little puff out of the archery gear decorated peacock so I took courage and asked him about the arrows.

At my question the little fellow froze. He was shorter than me and I’m under 5 feet 8 inches tall.  Once, I was taller. Gravity is winning. There was a pause in his existence.  He literally was frozen where he’d stood.  He eyed me with either a look of suspicion or viewed me as prey.  Either way it was awkward. His suspended stance appeared to be a sign that anyone within a five-foot radius of the human figurine should consider moving further away.

Backing away without turning my back on the motionless archer it could be seen that the fellow was beginning to vibrate. The arrows in his quiver starting to rattle like maracas as his face became a dark crimson.

Then, he blurted out, “THESE ARROWS COST $47.00 A PIECE!”

Well, okay I thought to myself as we both walked away from one another. That was a close as I got to the $47.00 arrows.

I have no idea who the little fellow was and still don’t.  Nor do I care.  What amazes me and something I won’t forget was his puffery.

One day I expect I’ll shoot expensive arrows.  Right now I’m flinging arrows THAT COST $4.90 A PIECE.  Those cheap arrows have won six out of seven tournaments in the men’s senior or masters’ divisions.  I don’t know if that says something about me or those archers flinging the high-end arrows. What I can say is that the archers with the expensive arrows always look the part.