How Much Do You Shoot Everyday?

It is a question I’ve been asked a lot, “How Much Do You Shoot Everyday?” I’ve asked it of others. Is there some magic number where if you fired off that magical number of arrows it would make you a champion is a set amount of time. There is not such a magical number outside the world of Harry Potter. Harry, of course, wouldn’t rely on an archer’s skill, he’d simple apply the magic.

Neither you nor I have that magic. We have to practice. So, how many arrows per day is a good goal?

One of my favorite answers refers to Olympic archers. The answer posted read that Olympic  archers shoot 5000 arrows per week. I doubt it. Here’s why,

5000 arrows per week comes to 833 arrows per day for a six-day week. I do not use a 7-day workweek for sports since there should be an allowance for recovery.

Assuming Olympians are on a 24-hour day allow 8 hours for sleep. Athletes that are sleep deprived don’t make for excellent performers. That leaves 16 hours. Among those sixteen hours three will be used up eating and other nutrition necessities (intake and output) leaving 13 hours. An hour of the day is used up for dressing, undressing, showering and other hygiene making a remainder of 12 hours.

If 100% of those 12 hours could be spent flinging arrows down range that would be 69.4 arrows per hour for 12 solid hours. That’s one arrow every 51.87 seconds for 60 minutes per hour at 12 hours non-stop. Once again, the number doesn’t pass the sniff test.

Realistically, setting a number of arrows isn’t the best way to frame practice. Your time available to practice is going to determine how many arrows you can shoot per day. If you’re lucky you have several hours of practice time available per day.

With whatever amount of time you have for practice build a plan for that session beforehand. On other words, don’t just show up at a range and start shooting. Be prepared with a specific practice plan. That way you can get the most of the time you have available.

To answer question – more can be better. Too many isn’t good. Too few are not enough.

Reviewing Practice

During practice it is a good idea to take notes. A small pad or folding piece of paper is adequate for making notes on shots.

Coaching Tip

I carry a small pad in my quiver on which to record my notes. Here is what I am reviewing from this mornings practice.

First off, today’s morning practice was a mock 3D tournament. This means, in ASA style, 20 targets. There are times when warm up isn’t possible, so to make this practice more complicated I did not take any warm-up shots.

The twenty targets included three bear, three pigs, three turkey, three deer, two javelina, two mountain lions, badger, mosquito, bobcat and a rabbit. All these targets are either small or medium sized.

All targets were shot without the benefit of a range finder. A range finder was used after the shot to compare its measured distance with the distance I selected for the target.

Notes from this morning

The final score was not overwhelming well – 181 or 9.05 points per target. I shot three 5s which need attention. The first 5 was a small black bear at 33 yards. The elevation was fine and the range finder was in agreement with the distance I’d judged. The problem – I rushed the shot and pulled the shot right. The next 5 was a badger at 28 yards (ranger finder 29 yards). The arrow was perfect right to left; I’d judged the yardage well. But, I’d had poor placement of my aim. I attributed this to the early morning lack of light and overcast sky. Perhaps, if I’d approached the shot more slowly I might have had a better score.

The worst 5 was on a target I typically hit in the 10 ring. This was a cinnamon bear at 32 yards. The error was a major, my worst mistake, judgment of distance. I shot it for 38 yards, it was only 32 yards.

I did have 3 twelves. One each on a javelina (26 yards), a deer (30 yards) and a small pig (32 yards.) The other scores were eight 10s and five 8s.

This afternoon I’ll go back to the range and shoot most of these targets again from 20 to 45 yards in 5-yard increments. The very small targets, bobcat and rabbit for example I’ll not shot from over 30 yards because their shooting lane isn’t long enough. But, my notes reveal where I need work. Without the notes I’d be guessing at areas where I need to improve.

Keeping notes doesn’t take much time and reviewing them for weaknesses then working on them is important to improving your scores.

Rushed Shots and Follow Through

There are excellent archers here in Georgia. Along with those experts are superior coaches. That’s not to suggest that in your neck of the woods there are less qualified coaches and less amazing shooters. Despite the quality there are occasional missteps by archers that seem highlighted during 3D competitions.

The top professionals do make these two mistakes; only not as often as archers who are not as proficient as professionals. These common errors are: rushed shots and lack of adequate follow through.

Coaching Tip

During practice these two errors don’t pop up so often. Yet, the archer that smacks all 10s, 12s or 11s (for IBO) on a foam animal while practicing can at times get caught making one or both of the errors when competing.

In competition you can reduce the likelihood of committing these two mistakes. Rest assured if you fall into the group of decent archers failing during a 3D tournament because you are rushing and dropping your follow through you are not unique.

You may be like many archers that study the form of great shooters. It is a good way to learn. Notice how calm they seem letting the shot happen then holding on the target long after the arrow is released. Next time you’re in competition watch how often less accomplished archers appear to rush a shot or shorten their follow through.

If you suspect you may be committing one or both of these errors work them out during practice. When you find yourself in competition relax and move through each shot deliberately. Take all the time you need (within the time limit) to find your best position on the target. Once you’ve made your shot hold on the target until you hear your arrow strike it. For some the follow through in this manner may seem exaggerated, but a longer time holding on the target during the follow through may buy you some points.

If you’ve practice working though these mistakes trust your training during competition.

USA Archery Level 2

This was a bit of effort. Classes, classroom tests, online courses with more tests and a background check.  Glad to have this complete.

If you live in the Athens, Georgia area and are looking to try archery or are already into the sport and would like some help give me a call.

https://www.teamusa.org/usa-archery/judges-and-coaches/coaches/usa-archery-coach-locator