Cycling and Training on a Computrainer

(This is not about archery. It’s regarding cycling and training. The abstracts below are linked if you’re into sports physiology and medicine.)

This is about the Computrainer by Racermate. It is without doubt the best training tool I’ve ever owned. I’ve had the one I use for over two decades.

My set-up

It’s a product I purchased originally for research. At that time I was studying oxygen desaturation during maximal effort among elite cyclists. (1) A decade after that initial study I repeated it and found the same result. (2) The abstracts are linked below and both appeared in peer-reviewed journals.

One of the many data screens

The device is a trainer connected to a computer. The name “Computrainer” isn’t much of a leap. I actually have a dedicated computer and leave everything connected including one of my bikes. As you might image, there is a wealth of physiologic data that can be collected from the Computrainer. In my research I added more diagnostic devices and discovered some cool stuff, which is included in one of my patents stemming from the research.

I use this screen a lot

These days, I’m not doing data collection. I use the decades old Computrainer for its primary purpose, for training. What is gives me is enough live data to keep pushing. It also let’s me ride courses, like the Ironman Hawaii (which I did yesterday). It is an excellent way to enjoy long hours in the saddle while not going anywhere.

Virtual cruise on the Queen K in Hawaii
200 Tour de France on another screen

During long sessions, I’ll add a video, yesterday’s was the 2000 Tour de France, and watch that as I ride. It does help the time pass. The Computrainer remains unparalleled as a training tool. There have been days I chose to ride it rather than going outside. A bonus is no cars being driven have phone addicted drivers to contend with.

You’ll notice it is dark outside – it was only 5:15 PM.

Reference:

1.) Lain D, Jackson C: Exercise induced hypoxemia (EIH) desaturation zones: a use or athletic training. Chest, Vol 118, No. 4, page 203S, 2000. Lain, David, and Chris Jackson. “EXERCISE-INDUCED HYPOXEMIA (EIH) DESATURATION ZONES: A USE FOR ATHLETIC TRAINING.” Chest, Oct. 2000, p. 203S. Academic OneFile, Accessed 14 Dec. 2017.

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?id=GALE%7CA71127451&sid=googleScholar&v=2.1&it=r&linkaccess=fulltext&issn=00123692&p=AONE&sw=w&authCount=1&isAnonymousEntry=true

2.)Lain, DC, Granger W: Oxygen saturation and heart rate during exercise performance. Anesthesia and Analgesia

https://www.stahq.org/files/1813/5845/7616/18_Lain2_Abstract.pdf

(Click the site above – this has neat color graphics. Check out the wattage the elite cyclists cranked out over a 10 mile course)

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