The 5-Spot Dilemma

The Georgia State Championship and NFAA Sectional (5-Spot) are in a week. I am still shooting my low-end beginner Olympic Recurve – riser $149.00, limbs $99.00.

The arrows, a recent change, are Black Eagle Intrepids.  These arrows are $4.42 each. By competitive standards not typical high-end gear. Nevertheless, I am shooting well with this entry-level equipment.

The initial plan for the upcoming competition was to shot a single spot.  The problem is that when I shoot 5 arrows at the same spot I break one every 10 to 15 arrows.  Often it is just the nock.  The problem with that is the nock won’t release from the shaft for a quick replacement.  The inner diameter of the Intrepid arrows is simply too tight for a fast repair.  In fact, I’ve yet to have a successful repair.  I end up cracking the arrow trying to free the remained of the nock.

Of the broken arrows, that is while shooting 5 arrows at a single target, over twenty ends it us usual to have a Robin Hood.  I have, from practice wear, 15 arrows remaining.

At the pace the arrows break after the first day of shooting the upcoming tournament, using a single spot, I have just 9 arrows remaining. That means on the second day at 2/3 of the way through the tournament’s second day I have 5 arrows remaining.  If the stats remain true on the last end I’d be an arrow short.

The solutions: 1) buy more arrows before I depart for the tournament, 2) shoot a 5-spot.

I’ve been practicing exclusively using a 5-spot.  This is specially to save arrows. Occasionally, 1 out of a hundred times, I miss the four line by a hair.  A single spot would be a never miss.  My 5-spot practice scores aren’t for a beginner recurve archer: mean is 283 with a range of 278 to 292.  Out of 100 arrows 66 of them will land in the white for a 5 and out of 60 arrows (tournament quantity) 18 will be Xs. (average)  My concern is the 1 in 100 where I miss the blue.

The dilemma is whether or not to shoot the 5-spot versus buying more $4.42 arrows and shoot the single spot.

Arrows, Arrows, Arrows….

It didn’t seem like a wise use of money to fork out big bucks for high-end equipment when switching to an Olympic recurve from compound bows.  (145 days ago) Why do that when the compound bows were in the $800.00 range purchased new. It wasn’t as if prior archery gear had been high-end.

When it came to high-end gear the nicest pieces of equipment associated with the compound bows had been the sight and release.  Those were high quality Axcel/TruBall products.

The arrows shot using the compound bows had been purchased and prepared by folks that, at the time, seemed to know better.  Two out of three times their suggestions were correct.  For the remaining third the arrows are too stiff.

Some ‘expert’ on YouTube presented a video suggesting that spine calibration is a myth so long as the arrows shot are fletched.  The video he posted was an experiment where he fired off sets of arrows of various spine strength using fletched and bare shaft arrows.  He was shooting a recurve bow. I repeated his experiment.  My results yielded an opposing result.

I’d hoped for similar results.  I’ve got some nice arrows, those among the good 2/3 of my moderately priced arrows and wanted to upgrade the Easton 1000 arrows I’ve been shooting with the Olympic recurve.  What I found is that the stiffer more expensive arrows didn’t bend properly and the tail end of those arrows hit my riser.  The flex between nodes simply wasn’t flexing properly. I was hoping to save some money by avoiding the purchase of new arrows.

The Easton 1000s are excellent beginner’s arrows.  I’ve won two State Championships using a $249.00 Olympic recurve in the Men’s Senior Division shooting those $5.00 arrows.  However, I know the $5.00 arrows are holding me back when it comes to a few extra points. (For now there is nothing wrong with the inexpensive bow)

The tip of the Easton 1000s comes included along with fletching for the five bucks.  The tip is 65 grain, which is okay.  The fletching is a bit tall again okay for indoor tournaments.  Okay is not great in competition.  The set up does mean being just a hair off on form and the shot will be completely uncompensated.  In words too often associated with archery gear – these arrows are not very forgiving.

Part of the lack of forgiveness is that the spine of an Easton 1000 peaks at around 29 pounds.  As I’ve improved I’m pulling 34 pounds. On a 3-spot with the gear at hand I’m averaging 9 points per arrows without a clicker (I don’t have one yet). I believe with a stiffer spine and more weight on the tip I’d get my average per arrow up a little.  The current fletching is dragging on my rest and that too can be improved by shooting a smaller profile vane.

If I cut the 1000s a bit that would stiffen the spine. But, adding a heavier pile weakens the spine.  Changing the fletching isn’t an issue aside from I know it needs to be done and simply haven’t done it.

The best bet is to purchase new arrows with the correct spine, cut them to the correct length, add the correct pile weight to compensate for the cut and have low profile vanes.

Victory Archery, a maker of arrows, does have a moderately priced arrow that, per their spine calculators, meets the spec for my current shooting. Lancaster Archery does have them on clearance (the 2019 version).  Even so, spine, nocks, vanes will still run around $250.00.

My estimate of points per arrows gain for the $250.00 investment is 0.18 points per arrow against a vertical 3-spot.* It seems like just a little but it really is a lot of gain.  I just hate spending the money right now. (It also might help to adjust the tiller to positive versus neutral)

* calculation based on distance from center, 60 shots, measured in the yellow only. (45 our of 60 arrows. 15 red arrows attributed to form errors and dropped) Distance mean variance on average times spine weakness estimated percentage.  (1.6 X 0.11 = 0.176 rounded up) 3-spot, outdoor, no wind – when it is windy all bets are off.

First Olympic Recurve Event: Georgia State Field Championship 2020

On Saturday October 17, 2020 it was 38°F in Acworth, Georgia at 0830.  The weather report had ‘suggested’ the temperature would be 48°F at 0830 with a rapidly increasing warmth to follow.  The weather forecast had been off. It was cold at the Kennesaw Archery Club for the Georgia State Field Archery Championship.

On Wednesday the 14th of October, a day before registration closed I entered the event. The reasoning was to put off entry until nearly the last moment in the event of a forecast to rain or me still flinging arrows like a clown with a water gun.  The forecast for the weather wasn’t the main deterrent for a rejection to enter.  In reality if was the drive through Atlanta being the major issue against attending.

The secondary consideration was whether or not I’d make a fool of myself shooting at $249.00 Olympic recurve in the Men’s Senior Division having only just started shooting a recurve.  In total I’d had 62 days of actual practice shooting an Olympic recurve.  Granted, I believed those days to have been fairly high quality practice days.

The Olympic recurve is a satisfying bow.  At $249.00 for limbs and riser a barging for entertainment.  As a serious competitive bow, well since I’ve not shot any other Olympic recurve is seems just right.  The arrows that are flung off the bow’s rest cost $5.50 each complete with fletching, pile and nock.

Those arrows are a tad under-spined, un-cut, and there is no clicker on the bow.  There is a sight, which is, as sights go, one level above the trash.  I admit openly, the sight is awful. The price for the sight was around $20.00 new.  In this case, you really do get what you pay for.

The sight moves on it own, the aperture rotates between shots, and the calibration assembly aligns “in the ballpark” at best. “In the ballpark” after 62 practice days is probably good enough.

At 0830 there I was, sitting in my Ford-150, at the Kennesaw Archery Club’s range for the tournament.  I was thinking, this is really stupid.  I am going to be so embarrassed. But, I’d made the first leg of the drive (getting there) paid my $35.00 registration fee, so I might as well enjoy, albeit cold, the learning experience.

I unloaded myself from the pick-up, grabbed my introductory level bow and somewhat miserably began the hike to the check-in table. There I confirmed my initial target assignment and walked over to the warm-up range.

Along the way I passed friends and opponents.  This is my first recurve tournament.  I’d won the event in 2019 in the Men’s Masters 60 year old age group using a compound bow.  The recurve contest wasn’t as a Master.  I’d decided to compete for a while in the Senior division.

A friend of mentioned he’s not going to Gator Cup because they don’t have a 70+ division.  Many tournaments bail out of the age group divisions at 50.  I figured I might as will shoot with the guys under 50 since I’m starting something new.  At least there will always be a division in that age group.

There were comments about the in my hand recurve, of course.  There were folks suggest their opinion that the discount equipment was “Good for you.”  Said in the vein of “That’s a piece of crap but maybe you’ll have some cheap fun and not lose too many of those toy arrows.”  There was even the curiosity regarding what happened to the blue rubber tips I’d removed from the arrows to insert the 65 grain pile. One polite fellow, when he mentally digested my bow and arrow set changed the subject to cycling.

Others had more invasive questions. As answered: No, the set did not arrive in the mail zip tied together on cardboard and sealed in vacuum packed plastic. No, this bow isn’t available at Wal-Mart.

Admittedly, the budget bow and arrow set assisted in a good time. The sight was a frustration since it wouldn’t stay locked. It was a minor problem that was dealt with after each arrow.

One thing I will add is the Kennesaw Archery Club has a very nice facility.  Another is Atlanta traffic sucks!

When I left I brought this with me. (No 5-finger discount, I actually won it) 1st Place Senior Mens Recurve Division

Fairweather Tab Has Arrived

It was a day to calibrate my sight.  My initial string was unraveling and my new 60X string was on the bow.  The yardages were a bit off.  Nothing to do other than recalibrate the sight.

Sighting is dull work.  I do have flags at 5-yard increments that were placed using a tape measure.  That does save time.  The distances are from 20 yards to 75 yards.  When I want to shoot at 70 meters there is a tree than exactly marks the spot.

During the morning I worked out to 40 yards.  In the afternoon I stopped at 55 yards.  At this point I’d shot 120 arrows.  My inexpensive Avalon Classic was about worn through and I could no longer feel in my fingertips of my drawing hand.  I seemed better to finish tomorrow.

While I was shooting the mail arrived.  In it was my Fairweather Tab.  Obviously, I was going to shoot more arrows.

The pressure on fingertips is minimized using this Fairweather Tab. The bow string slides away smoothly. The ring verse an elastic pull to tighten the tab is consistent and doesn’t pinch.

And the new tab is wonderful.  The only minor issue is that the Kangaroo leather is still a little stiff and was pinching my nocks.  Another 60 arrows at 18 meters and the Roo was loosening up.

After 120 arrows and switching to the Fairweather the difference is like night and day compared to the Avalon Classic.  Those last 60 arrows were painless.

The Avalon Classic is a fair starter tab. If you shoot a lot you will be upgrading

The Avalon Classic got me started shooting an Olympic recurve.  It wasn’t a bad tab for a beginner.  The Fairweather tab is a significant upgrade.

But, I suppose in a few days of breaking in this tab I’ll need to start over on the sight calibration.

The Avalon Classic Finger Tab

In July 2020 I decided to give Olympic Recurve archery a try.  I had no idea how much I’d enjoy switching from compound bow to recurve.  So, I didn’t pay heavily for the gear I purchased.  That purchase arrived on July 22, 2020.

Today is August 11, 2020.  I’ve shot that inexpensive Olympic recurve a fair amount.  I’ve tried not to over do it hoping to avoid an over use injury.  Thus far that has been a success.  My only complaint is my fingertips on my hand used to draw the string. They are numb and hurt from the tissue damage caused from drawing the bow.

The poundage is only 34 pounds.  I started slowly hoping to build strength in my fingertips.  At the beginning I shot only 100 arrows a day, 50 in the morning and 50 in the afternoon.  I’ve also built in recovery days, two per week now down to one day off per week.  My max current daily arrow count is 160.  Some days I’ve shot less when I am working through a “Tournament Test” game. Once a week I play a game where I shoot a home range tournament and the arrow count is lower than my training days.

It has been 62 days since I received the bow.  Already I’ve learned a few things about inexpensive gear.

One, cheap sights suck, two, inexpensive arrows aren’t bad for beginning, and three a low cost finger tab isn’t going to last neither will it give much support to fingers.

The Avalon Classic Finger Tab

The Avalon Classic is a budget finger tab.  I paid $14.99 for mine.  For the price you get an entry-level tab that, for me, hasn’t held up. With just under 5000 arrows shot using the tab it has begun to break down significantly.

While walking to pull arrows I noticed a little screw on the ground.  I had no idea where it came from and could not find a missing screw anywhere on my bow.  The same thing happened a second time.  I discovered the screws had fallen out of the Avalon Classic. It is amazing that I found the at all considering my range is a clearing in the woods behind my house.

The leather is wearing away. Note: I removed the hook for my little finger.

When it rains I continue to shoot.  The two layers of leather on the Classic will slip as they are forced together while drawing.  But worst of all the leather is what you get for $14.99 and wears thin fast. Believe me, go a few days shooting 160 arrows per day and the Avalon Classic will let you know you’ve been practicing.

These two screws fell out. Amazing that I found them on my range

If you are only shooting about 25 to 30 arrows a day this tab might last you 7 months. It is a tab that is inexpensive and an honest place to start.  But, if you work your way up to over 700 arrows per week you’ll be getting a new tab soon.

I’ve ordered a Fairweather tab to replace the Avalon Classic.  I’ll see how that one does while I continue to work my daily arrow count higher.

The Fairweather tab. It costs $74.95. Certainly not inexpensive.

 

Regrouping

For six years and eight months I’ve shot a compound bow.  For that same amount of time I wanted to shoot a recurve.  The pandemic seemed like a good point to switch.

It was October of 2013 in Boulder, Colorado and I was killing time.  I was there for a meeting with the larger company that had purchased the smaller company where I was an officer. I loved our little business.  The bigger fish also loved our little company.  They admitted it with the loving offer they’d applied to the purchase.

Flying back and forth from Baltimore, Maryland (my primary residence being in Easton, MD) to Boulder isn’t a tough flight.  However, I needed to attend meetings at the end of one week and the beginning of the next.  So, I stayed in Boulder over the weekend.

I’d found a nice 5K to run on Sunday and there was some fun planned as a result of being stuck in Boulder.  There are worse places to spend a weekend alone.  On Saturday I drove out to do some sight seeing.  Along the way I spotted a cool looking local (not a chain) sporting goods shop on the cusps of the city.  It seemed like a neat place to look around.

Pulling into the parking lot I left my rental car and walked into the shop.  There wasn’t any real intention to make a purchase.  It was an opportunity to look over a local sports shop.

When I traveled I frequently had free time away from work.  During those breaks I sightsee.  Some of the main places, aside from typical tourist traps; I’d visit old churches, bike shops, and sports shop.  Visiting old churches in Europe was especially enjoyable.  Bike shops in Italy were incredible.  And sports shops in the US are always fun.

Outside Boulder walking into the local sporting good store I knew I might find information about places to run or even another race for a future trip.  What I ended up with was unexpected.

Walking through the rows of merchandise I passed a boxed bow kit for adults.  It held a Samick beginner recurve bow and the price was $78.00.   Initially, I walked passed the bow.  Completing my tour I headed out to the parking lot.  Still, I kept thinking about that inexpensive bow. Turing around I headed by to take another look.

The bow was a take down recurve, which meant I could easily ship it home if I bought it.  A sales person came over and answered my questions.  Figuring, what the heck, I bought the bow.  A week later I was home with the bow shooting it at a bale of hay.

It was fun.  Of course, I knew I needed a better bow or at least heavier limbs.  The bow came with 28-pound limbs.  Rather than searching for a new bow I went online and found a bow shop in Pennsylvania where I could get 35-pound limbs, Lancaster Archery Supply.  I ordered the limbs.

In the meantime, while I waited for the limbs to arrow I made the decision to buy a more expensive bow.  This is when I learned finding a recurve bow at a local bow shop is pretty difficult.  There were compound bows galore. There were no recurves at three bow shops within my driving radius.

I didn’t want to try an order a recurve from Lancaster Archery since I knew nothing about them aside from their location.  So, I ended up with a compound bow in my hands before the 35-pound limbs arrived.  Those 35-pound limbs arrived and remained unboxed for over six years.

A few weeks ago and tens of thousands of arrows shot using a compound bow I found myself on pandemic pause from competitive archery.  It seemed like a fun thing to do to go shoot that old Samick recurve.

Several hundred arrows later I opened the box that had arrived from Lancaster Archery six years ago and connected the 35-pound limbs.

By now I knew Lancaster Archery Supply.  In fact, I knew them so well I trusted them to help put together an order for a new recurve.  This time an Olympic recurve.

Again, I made a conservatively price purchase.  The Olympic recurve is a Galaxy Tourch riser with Win Win WNS limbs (34 pounds). The stabilizers are WNS, the rest is WNS, the tab is an Avalon Classic, the plunger WNS, Cartel Maxion V-bar, a Win Win string, a Cartel clicker and a Cartel Focus sight.

It arrived 22 days ago. Applying a coupon from Lancaster the package which included a $17.99 Cartel folding recurve stand and $14.95 Selway Limbsaver stringer came to: $460.64. Subtract those accessories and the finger tab the Olympic recurve rig came to $412.71, less than the price of a top shelf riser.

The first day after putting the bow together I shot it. The arrow rest immediately broke.  Lancaster sent a replacement.  The Cartel sight is only good for 3-4 shots before it has to be tightened and the Cartel clicker, which needs to attach to the sight extension rod won’t attach there.  It will attach to the riser, but I need it extended.  I am shooting without a clicker for now.

But, I am shooting clickerless.  At the moment I am only shooting from 18-yards.  And it is a whole lot of fun. Whether or not I’ll ever be competitive shooting a recurve remains unknown.  Either way, this is a great way to regroup.

In a Tight Spot

“Well, that was expensive,” my wife said to me as I walked in from archery practice.

She’d made the comment based on what I’d held up for her to see from a window while I was still outside. What she saw were broken arrows.

Robin Hood shots, where one arrow lands in the center of another arrow already in a target, are pricey.  I hope, when shooting multiple arrows into the same target not to shoot Robin Hoods.  It happens and arrows break.

I was already running low on the arrows I use for 3D.  I had eight when one busted on a good shot from 27 yards last week. The angle was the problem putting the arrow through the center and downward toward the metal post that holds up the target.  Naturally, the arrow intersected with the metal. Down to seven arrows.

Today was a nightmare.  At 38 yards the turkey seemed safe enough.  Two shots later and two more arrows gone.  When I heard it I couldn’t believe it.  Down to five arrows.

I moved on from the turkey to a mountain lion target and shot it at 41 yards then 38 yards.  Each time five arrows shot.  No problem with any arrows.

A deer was the next setup.  This is a fairly difficult downhill target so I wanted to start safely then increase the distance. Staring at 35 yards the first shot was a high ten.  The next shot, learning from the first error, was a 12.

This deer isn’t a tiny target.  Since I’d hit the 12 ring I figured to put one more arrow in that ring.  I made the shot pretty much exactly like the prior shot even though I was aiming for the arrow to land a bit to the left of the first.

The crack of two arrows become one tubular mess is a nasty noise.  It sounds like money being wasted.  Two Robin Hoods within minutes.  I was shooting with pins and a sight that does not have magnification. I thought, what are the odds?

Only one arrow ended up broken in the deer; unlike the two busted in the turkey.  But, it left me with only four arrows for 3D.  At the rate they’re getting broken I’ll be empty by the end of the week.

You might think to yourself “That’s what he gets for shooting more than one arrow at the same target.”  That is true – it is impossible to Robin Hood a single arrow, it always takes two arrows.

However, if you shoot often you, too have shot more than once at the same target with more than one arrow.  So, hold off on tossing stones.

My wife was right, this practice was expensive.  It also puts me in a jam when it comes to arrows for 3D practice and competition.

One solution is to switch to Super Senior in the ASA classes. I’d change bows and use the skinny arrows I shoot in field archery.  I’ve got 18 of them.

Of course, I could buy a dozen new arrows.  It isn’t so much the money, well it is the money.  I hate spending money of arrows. Another consideration isn’t qualifying, I can qualify in a week.  The worry is this Covid-19.

At the last 3D competition social distancing was more a philosophy rather than a practice.  At that event archers from those counties that enclose Atlanta came to play.  My instincts are telling me to skip 3D for 2020.  My compulsion to compete is telling me something else. This is a tight spot.

Give me a break

I am running low on arrows for 3D.  Today, I busted one on an excellent shot.  The shot was at a steep angle. It was a tough shot. The arrow cut the line on the lower twelve right where the line intersects with the center 10 ring.  The arrow, unfortunately, hit metal in the target because of the angle.  A good shot with some bad luck.  The tip mushroomed the carbon fiber shaft. There went $22.65.

The $22.65 is the price of one of the arrows.  A dozen completely built will run $272.68.  Add tax and the price tag is $289.04.  That ain’t cheap.

I’m thinking:  Shoot these nice arrows until they are all gone.  Next, shoot some old Bemens I’ve got laying around. Then, shoot up some carbon express arrows.  There are a total of 24 arrows in the mixed bag. Yep, that might buy me a couple more seasons of fun.

Finding a workable combination

During the last competitive event I shot the lowest recorded score against a vertical 3-spot, inner 10s, in my life.  The score was 28 points below the six weeks average going into the tournament.  Something was clearly amok.

Naturally, I blamed the bow, an Elite Victory X from 2018.  The bow received the blame because the arrows were landing in similar disarray to the patterns revealed when the bearing in the cams failed.  Months ago, that bow, the 37, was shipped back to Elite for analysis.  They uncovered that the bearing in the cams had failed.  Elite replaced the bearing, returned the bow and it shot fine, again. At least for awhile.

At the 2020 Georgia State Indoor National Championship I suspected that those replaced bearing had again, following around 10,000 shots, bit the dust.  Looking at the cams I could see tiny specks of silver that made me more suspicious. I vowed to never shoot that bow again.

To replace the Victory 37X I tried a 2014 Elite 35.  It didn’t shot a whole lot better.  The fellows at Ace Hardware’s Bow Pro shop took a look at the 35 and went to work straighten it out.  The problem is that with the Elite 35, while I gained 10 points over the Georgia State flop, I was still 18 points below my prior average for 18-meters.

I tried an even older, purchased in 2013 when I started archery, Mathews Conquest Apex 7.  The bow shoots great and is extremely smooth.  The feel, however, is dramatically different from the two Elites and my scores were no better.

Today, shooting all three things remain a mess.  The Elite 35 landed me an average of just 9 points per arrow.  (That is until I noticed a screw missing on the limb pocked. Amazingly, I found it on the ground.) The Mathews was 8.5 points per arrow and the Victory 9.5 points per arrow.

To achieve the 9.5 points per arrow I ended up flinging arrows too stiff for the poundage I shoot.  Using a bare shaft the arrow, an Easton 2318 that has been cut 3 inches and has a 180 grain tip, the shaft shoots to the right.  A bare shaft 2314, uncut, with 100 grain tip shot even further to the right – which is not what I’d expected.

Two days out from the USA Indoor Nationals I am considering just tossing my arrows toward the target.

Sports Equipment -Buying Speed or Points

You don’t need the best equipment to enjoy a sport.  If you enjoy riding a bike and fitness is a goal just about any bike will work.  You could buy a $150.00 bicycle at Wal-Mart and have a decent time riding.  But, if you decided you wanted to race that $150.00 bicycle you wouldn’t stand a chance even against athletes with less fitness.

Decades ago I trained and raced on a Litespeed bike.  It was not their top of the line.  That Litespeed Natchez landed me on plenty of podiums.  Then, my wife bought me a top end racing bike.  It was a bike that had been used by a pro (King of the Mountain winner) in the Tour de France.  The bike was over 3 pound lighter than my titanium Litespeed.  Riding it, especially climbing, felt like cheating.

Where I trained at the time was extremely hilly.  Climbs that had been tough became laughable.

Years after I stopped racing on the Velodrome I wanted to ride track again.  I bought a low-end track bike and had a blast racing it.  Then, I bought a used high-end bike from an ex-National Sprint champion.  I went from having fun to taking medals. In cycling, buying the right gear can buy speed.  Going from a road style bike to a time-trial style bike, which puts a rider in an aero position, can increase speed up to 3 mph for the same energy output.

Archery is no different.  Having the right equipment for a specific event can add points.  For example, if you compete using a hunting rig against athletes of similar skill who use long stabilizers, scopes, and longer axel-to-axel bows you’ll probably not come out ahead.  You’ll have fun; you’ll probably not win.  That’s fine if fun is all you’re after.  There may come a point when you decide you’d like to compete on equal footing.  That will mean making an investment on the equipment to help get up onto a podium.

Now, you can have the best gear and still finish near the bottom.  The gear isn’t going to make you an expert if you don’t practice.  If you do put in the hours the best equipment can help you gain points. (Buy the equipment after you’ve reached a point in your development where it will become a winning factor)

The best gear does come at a price.  From experience I know that when competing in 3D using a target style bow I score higher than with a hunting style bow at the same distances.  To transform my hunting style bow to a 3D target type requires an investment of over $1000.00.  That is a bit pricey.

Taking that same bow and preparing it for 3D competition in the hunter class (better stabilizers, light and weights) is less expensive coming in around $300.00.  As I considered what I’d do to “buy” some points in 3D I began to consider the return on that investment.

For the investment of $1000 I can compete in open classes and the ASA Super Senior class.  The $450 investment puts me the hunter class of men from their 20s to 50s.  There is no 60-year age bracket for ASA and no IBO, where there is a 60-year-old age bracket, in Georgia.

Even choosing the $450 option I’m am behind because lenses, which magnify a target, are legal in ASA hunting classes and that means more money. Lenses can be quite beneficial as we age.  (I didn’t price those while checking the costs)

Before I retired and had a hefty disposable income money wouldn’t be a concern. Living on a fixed income one needs to be a bit more frugal with cheddar.

More than likely I’ll not upgrade any of my equipment.  I may not compete in the top tournaments where had I made the investment I might have bought a few points.  At the top events a point or two does make the difference.  Paying the registration and travel expense to arrive at a major event with sub-par equipment isn’t a prudent way to burn cash.

The equipment I use isn’t the most expensive.  Most of it falls into the Litespeed Natchez category of gear.  Not the most expensive, in some cases not the best, but in all cases good enough to enjoy the sport of archery.

If you plan to compete against the best athletes there will be a point where the best gear you can buy (or get from a sponsor) will aid your performance.