Aging and Exercise

In a recent paper sport champions and athletes were asked what they thought it took to become a champion.  The group had a large sub-set of Olympians (medal winners and participants), world Champions, State and Regional Champions as well as a sub-set of “chronic” athletes that had, at the time of the survey, not earned a Championship.  The group had spent a significant portion of the lives competing and training.    This of course makes sense because achieving a sport level of performance to reach a major championship takes years of preparation.1

The group seemed in general especially bright mentally as noted by their responses to the survey.  This wasn’t too surprising because the mean of the group is 53.8 years with a range of 26 to 78 years of age.1Nevertheless; there was an air of vitality among these athletes.

The survey was not done face-to-face with the athletes.  However, a large percentage of the athletes were seen face-to-face as part of typical social interactions.  In addition, after the survey a number of the athletes felt compelled to discuss the work by phone.  At times one or more of them were present at different gatherings.  Among those surveyed there remained a competitive presence as well as a high degree of verbal and body language mild posturing that could be considered friendly yet slightly aggressive regardless of age. The overall impression a bystander might of noted is that these people appeared extremely healthy and engaged. Certainly, the group is physically fit regardless of age.

An important observation is the general health of the group.  At a mean age of nearly 54 they are generally not overweight.  A few are overweight.  An archer is obese (but currently on a strict diet to drop the weight), there’s an overweight ex-football lineman (thought not obese) and in that category there is a PGA golf pro, and one ex-major league pitcher who are heavier than during their playing days.  In general, the group was not overweight. This may be attributed to; overall the group continues to exercise to a large degree.

Coaching Tip

Exercise is a relatively easy why to remain in good health both mentally and physically. 2,3As we age we can hope to die young at a very old age. In that vein exercise can be an adjunct to prolonged health and mental compacity.4Aside from clearly obvious physical attributes associated with aging and exercise, exercise decreases the degradation of our brains.5

Being physically active isn’t the sole method to engage our brains as we age. One study showed that individuals who played chess were cognitively engaged and had better health than a control group.6The same study, which compared the chess players to master level track and field athletes, revealed the athletes had more injuries than the chess players.6For those injuries the athletes gained a lower prevalence of chronic disease.6However, the chess players and athletes had a lower incidence of chronic disease compared to a control group.6

As we age, exercise can be modified to account for slower recovery times.7, 8Even with modification exercise among the senior population can improve quality of life and independent living.9As a measure of successful aging, exercising among the older population may be a model to support concepts of best health over longer durations as exercise works to protect the body including the brain.10, 11

Through active engagement in sport and exercise we can prolong better physical health and mental health. This becomes clear to an observer in the presence of chronic athletes.11By adding a regime of exercise to activities of daily living we can improve our quality of life.9

References:

  1. Lain,D C; What it takes to be a Champion.In review, NFAA Publication, Archery, Nov. 2018
  2. Trapp, S:Master athletes. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2001 Dec;11 Suppl:S196-207.
  3. Zhao E,Tranovich MJDeAngelo RKontos APWright VJ: Phys Sportsmed. Chronic exercise preserves brain function in master athletes when compared to sedentary counterparts. 2016;44(1):8-13. doi: 10.1080/00913847.2016.1103641. Epub 2015 Oct 29.
  4. Geard D,Reaburn PRJ, Rebar AL, Dionigi RA.: Masters Athletes: Exemplars of Successful Aging. J Aging Phys Act. 2017 Jul;25(3):490-500. doi: 10.1123/japa.2016-0050. Epub 2017 Jun 28.
  5. Tseng BY1,Uh J, Rossetti HC, Cullum CM, Diaz-Arrastia RF, Levine BD, Lu H, Zhang R.: Masters athletes exhibit larger regional brain volume and better cognitive performance than sedentary older adults. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2013 Nov;38(5):1169-76. doi: 10.1002/jmri.24085. Epub 2013 Mar 21.
  6. Patelia S, Stone RC,El-Bakri R, Adli M,Baker J.: Masters or pawns? Examining injury and chronic disease in male Master Athletes and chess players compared to population norms from the Canadian Community Health Survery. Eur Rev Aging Phys Act. 2018 Nov 30;15:15. doi: 10.1186/s11556-018-0204-z. eCollection 2018.
  7. Foster C, Wright G, Battista RA, Porcari JP. : Training in the aging athlete. Curr Sports Med Rep.2007 Jun;6(3):200-6.
  8. Soto-Quijano DA.: The Competitive Senior Athlete. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am.2017 Nov;28(4):767-776. doi: 10.1016/j.pmr.2017.06.009.
  9. Spirduso WW1,Cronin DL.: Exercise dose-response effects on quality of life and independent living in older adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S598-608; discussion S609-10.
  10. Geard D, Rebar AL, Reaburn P, Dionigi RA.: Testing a Model of Succesfult Again in a Cohart of Masters Swimmers. J Aging Phys Act.2018 Apr 1;26(2):183-193. doi: 10.1123/japa.2016-0357. Epub 2018 Mar 24.
  11. Tseng BY,Gundapuneedi T,Khan MA, Diaz-Arrastia R, Levine BD, Lu H, Huang H, Zhang R.: White matter integrity in physically fit older adults. Neuroimage. 2013 Nov 15;82:510-6. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.06.011. Epub 2013 Jun 12.

When Competition Becomes a Learning Exercise

It was a local fundraiser.  The drive to the indoor 3-spot tournament was less than 30 minutes from our home in Good Hope, Georgia.  It was held in one of my favorite towns, Madison, Georgia. The ‘turn out’ was excellent and the range was filled with archers.  My bow seemed to be back in order after a new string, re-tuning and checked for every possible malady. My last practice had been a good one.  It seemed the planets were aligned for a good score.

One of the many restored antebellum homes
Morgan County Court House in Madison, GA

Madison, Georgia is a beautiful historic Southern town.  It is one of the major historic attractions in the Peach State with around 100 antebellum homes that have been restored.  When we moved back to Georgia it is one of the towns we searched for a home.  In fact we found one, however it was in the city limits and there is a law against shooting a bow within city limits.  Had that not been the case, we’d have likely ended up living in a restored home.  We didn’t and archers will understand the decision not to settle there. Madison is close enough to where we ended up building that we can visit on the spur of the moment.

Downtown

The tournament was held in the new Morgan County High School gymnasium. Arriving an hour early I was lucky to have gotten a parking place that wasn’t a half of a mile away. At first I thought I’d gotten my information wrong – there seemed to be too many cars. But, no the morning line was packed full, as were the bleachers.

Ready for Christmas

The Morgan County high school gym in no way compared to my high school’s gym.  This modern gym was more like what I’d experienced in college.  Not all the bleachers were open. The upper bleachers behind the line were packed with friends and family that had come to watch the tournament.

Obviously, the bleachers down range are empty

The target of the day was a 3-spot.  I’ve been practicing against a 3-spot for over a month.  While my scores have been mimicking the Stock Market, my more recent practices had diverged and begun to rise. I knew I’d be shooting against some good archers in the 21-49 year old age group.  I felt ready, and I was for a while.

My first twelve arrows had all been smack in the center.  Number 13 followed suit, as did arrow 14.  At full draw on the third arrow of the end, with 40 seconds on the clock the whistle sounded. Three blows of the whistle.  It wasn’t time to pull arrows.  Did something happen and the next two blasts got halted due to some injury?  No one knew.  We all stopped shooting.

Looking down the line at the judge he made no comment of gesture.  Everyone waited.  Then, we waited some more.  The clock was down to 26 seconds, 25, 24, 23 – people began shooting.

Not me. I was worried.  Whatever had happened something was wrong or had gone wrong. Ten seconds.  I looked toward a friend on the line and he  shrugged and said, “Just shoot.” Eight seconds.  I shot with 1 second remaining.  Eight.

I knew I was now out of it.  An eight against these archers meant I was now on the range for practice.  For a flash I considered packing my gear and heading home I was so disappointed.  I didn’t, I stayed and worked though the 8.

I don’t know if the whistle hadn’t have incorrectly sounded whether or not the day would have gone better.  I expect it would have been better.  What it did do was provide a teaching moment, albeit a rare one.  Still, having a major distraction and getting through it was good practice.

Coaching tip

In any competition things outside of your control can happen. An athlete needs to be prepared to deal with the distraction, block it and move forward. I doubt I’ll have this sort of mistake happen a second time.  If it does, I’ll be better prepared.

Running in the Dark

Often you’ll read at this website that I post articles about fitness.  Many of those posts include stories about running.  While cardiopulmonary fitness isn’t essential to pick up a bow and shoot it, it does improve one’s health and ability to maintain an athletic posture during long archery tournaments.

During hunting season I wear orange every time I run trails

Among the exercises I do as part of my training regime, running is a major element.  One manufacturer of running shoes once had an advertisement that read, “Athletes Run.”  Whether or not archery is part of my life, I believe running will always be a part of it.

One of the running pleasures I find most appealing is trail running in the dark.  In the winter months running in the dark is easy – it’s dark when I get up to run. In the warmer months this isn’t the case.

A head lamp is a must for running in the dark. River, my lab, has a little read clip-on light on her collar.

For some, the thought of running through the woods in the dark might bring to mind some scene from a horror movie. Not the case for me.  I do run with a light – getting smacked by a tree or limb isn’t on my bucket list.

Some mornings we finish running just after sunrise

Running in the dark is peaceful in my mind.  The woods are quiet and calm.  Occasionally, I run in the direction of some critter and that can be startling, but never horrifying.  I do run with my dog, River, who’s a big girl who provides a sense of ease when I cross paths with an unexpected animal.

Find this at night and you’ll wake right up

There’s a 1.3-mile loop behind my house that cuts a perfect trail to travel whether running or hiking. Sometimes I’ll run it in the morning and hike it in the afternoon.  I try to cover a few laps each time, more laps when running.

I understand not everyone that reads this site runs beyond being chased.  If you do run and have access to trails try running in the dark it is an entirely new experience compared to running during the day light. Oh, carry a light, bring your dog, and watch how you plant your feet. Also, let someone know where you’ll be running and when to expect you home. Plus, carry your cell phone just in case.  Before you run a trail in the dark run it several times during the lighted part of the day to learn the trail.  If you happen to get off the trail it isn’t difficult to get turned around.  If you happen to get lost, wait where you are until the sun comes up to regain your bearings.  Clear lens running eye glasses are ideal for not getting an eye poked out by a low hanging pointy limb. Now that I think about, maybe you shouldn’t run in the dark – you’d probably get hurt.

An Impressive Younger Crowd of Archers

When I compete or practice in a group I am generally the oldest person in the crowd.  This is especially true during indoor practice or league shoots. Heck, while practicing at the local indoor range, I’m older than the parents that have driven their children to train.

At large events there will be people my age and older. During an outdoor competition last summer there were a couple of archers in the 70’s. Excluding league events where there are no age divisions, I’ve shot in 12 tournaments so far this year.  Of those I competed in my age group six times and in younger divisions six times.

In the senior division (the younger group), I won 3 times, got two second places, and one third.  In the masters (my age group) I won twice, got three seconds and a fourth. You’d think I had a slight edge against the younger fellas but the bulk of the loses came during the time we were moving and my practice wasn’t great.

Being the oldest person in a crowd is a bit weird.  There’s very little common ground for conversation.  Most of the people I routinely see on the range are more concerned with getting a drivers license, turning 18 so they can move out of their parents’ home, or where they’ve applied to college.  On the other hand, I worry about my portfolio, trade wars, and what my grandchildren are going to break next. (Either bone or property, I never know)

What strikes me most of the youngest sub-section of the group I see most often and shoot against on a weekly basics is the overall high degree of good manners and respectfulness of others they exhibit. There average age is 17 with a range of 15 to 22 years old. Each of them would make their parents proud.

They also make their coach proud.*  As a group they have a 70% win rate at tournaments.  Not just the local events, but national and international competitions. While taking a break on the range yesterday I was flipping though an archery magazine and there on the pages was one of the archers, highlighted for winning at a World Championship.

Here’s the competitive frustration about shooting with and against them – missing one X takes you out of the money on league nights.  A nine among this crowd doesn’t cut it.

It’s fun to shoot with this group.  But, I wonder, after some of them leave for college, get roommates, cars, and jobs will their performance falter.  For a few yes, the writing is already on the wall.  For others, will their future hold decades of shooting that provides an income to exceed that of those that sought a more traditional route to self sustainment? Probably.

  • There coach, Big John Chandler is a USA Level 4 NTS Coach.

Like the Stock Market, this Down Turn Will Head Up

There’s a lot of data on my archery spreadsheets.  Five years, one month and 18 days worth of data is a lot.  Over time the data shows a graphic of how scores have improved. It further covers equipment, environmental conditions and how I felt.

Over the past several weeks the steady rise in 3-spot performance I’d been so proud of has dropped. The drop was nearly instantaneous. I reviewed my shooting and went through deliberate practice sessions hoping to reset my form.  I did discover a few bow issues and perhaps those problems contributed to the falling scores.

Those drops may, as I noticed in the past, have matched the Stock Market.  When it drops, I worry.  I worry about the interest rate climbing (again), the trade war, and political unrest in Washington.  I can’t do a thing to change those variables, but I do not like millionaires and billionaires screwing around with the market based on their power struggles – especially when it negatively impacts me.

Or, the drop in scores may be over practice.  It is easy to fall into a pattern of worrying that the other guy is practicing more and practice more. There is a point where the return isn’t worth the wear.

The failure to move up to an average score of 590 for 60 arrows on the inner ten 3-spot may also be mental.  That’s a good score. I’ve surpassed it having shot a 593 a few weeks ago.  But, when X’s begin falling into place it is easy to think that it is a fluke.

The 593 told me I could shoot a 600.  Today, during the morning’s practice I shot a 568.  Nowhere near to where I’d been shooting.  Thing is this has happened before and it will happen again. Whatever the root cause of the dip, I know I’m missing the ten.  Not by much but enough to become frustrating.

Certainly, like the Stock Market, there’s no call for alarm.  Simply handle any potential cause, make any correction available, and continue to push for that 600. And like the Stock Market, the yield will improve over time.

(The day after I wrote this post the Market improved – as did my 3-spot score.)

 

That Picture from the Event

Throughout my sporting activities there have been loads of pictures taken of the events where I competed. In running and triathlon races they’re always a pile of photographers snapping shots in hopes those digitalized athletes will exchange money for the memory.

I good friend of mine was a professional photographer and he’s often come to races where I’d entered and take pictures. Some of them were of me.

At the IBO World Championships, one year, I’m pretty sure photographers where on the ranges snapping up images they sold. I’m not certain, but I’m pretty sure.

During that tournament, I looked over the photographs available to review at a booth with a computer at the ready to search for pictures of yourself. My search proved empty. I moved on without further inquiry.

There are a few pictures of me on this website, mostly taken by my wife unless the image is of me is some race. In that case, I probably bought the ego-enriching photo.

What I can say about archery is that I rarely make the cut for a picture unless my wife takes it. I did, however, finally make to cut at the Georgia Archery Association 25-Meter Indoor Championship, this past weekend in Statesboro, Georgia.

The tournament had around 152 archers competing. At the Facebook page where the organizers said we could find our pictures that I checked.  I discovered there are 257 pictures of the event. That’s nearly a 2:1 picture per archer ratio. It seemed the odds of finding myself at full draw, looking determined and dashing were pretty good.

Scanning the 257 pictures it was clear that whoever captured them knew what they were doing with a camera. There were some excellent shots. In one the fellow shooting directly to my front was shown a full draw in perfect form. In another the lady behind me, a bare bow archer, is seen, bow in hand, gazing downrange, in silent contemplation.

Alas, there is no glorious close up of me with bow in hand projecting an air of professional athleticism. On the other hand, neither is there a ruined image of me with a finger up my nose. However, there is one picture where I made the cut. (See below)

Look closely, at the end of the line, under the letter ‘n’ in the word ‘center’ you’ll notice a sleeveless elbow. That’s me.

Well, it is the bow.

There seemed to be something off during my last competition. In fact, my arrow placement has been dropping. It was so bad during last week’s tournament I shot two eights at 18 meters.The last tournament was scored with the inner ten equaling 11 points. Despite a recent slump I was optimistic.  Before long it was apparent something was clearly amuck.

Things started pretty good but didn’t last. Before I’d shot nine arrows I knew the monkey was on my back. My arrows were flying all over the place. My first thought was that I’d hit rock bottom. My second thought was that something was wrong with my equipment.

The equipment should be fine. It had been checked out in the previous week. Still, when I got home I took my stabilizers and scope off my Elite Victory X and put them on my Elite Energy 35. Low and behold – the arrows were landing more or less where I wanted them to land.

The arrows are Easton 2018s. The Victory X is a 60lb bow set up for around 54 lbs. The Elite Energy is a 50 lbs. bow giving me 52 lbs. I’d shot 2014s with the bows in the past and moved over to a stiffer arrow few weeks ago. With the Victory things had been looking good. Then, things didn’t look so good.

At last year’s Georgia 50 meter State Championship, I was training with the Victory. Prior to the Championship I went back to the Energy and won the event setting a new State record. I did the same for the next outdoor tournament and again set a new record* using the Energy. When shooting the Victory the arrows just seem to shift. I’d have to adjust windage when there was no wind.

Following that I took the Victory to the local bow shop where I’d purchased the bow explaining that something seemed off with the bow. I also contacted Elite looking for help. Elite didn’t respond.

Indeed, the limbs had somehow loosened and one was no longer matching the other. Corrections were taken and the bow performed well. Well, for a short while.

This latest problem was soon chased back to the bow. The Victory, set at 54 lbs. was tested and found to have a draw weight of 46 lbs. Forty-six pounds from a bow that has a maximum draw weight of 60 is seriously out of whack. At the Indoor Nationals last year (the tournament for which I’d bought the bow) during bow check in I discovered the bow had dropped the poundage. I’d assumed it was a variance between measuring devices.

The Victory X is a nice bow. Mine is nine months and 5 days old. I shoot about 100 arrows a day on average. My Victory X seems to have some issue with staying tight.

The recent discovered change in draw weight isn’t the first time – it is now the third. The first, I blamed it on variance of measuring devices. The second time, well no fault was assigned. This third time, well it is the bow. The third time is also the charm.

Today, while practicing, I had to pause and tighten the locking screws that are on the sides of the limb pockets. At this point I have no idea why this bow gets loose. But, I do hope it can hold together long enough to compete this weekend.

*Unofficial record. No higher score can be found online and I have contacted the State officials to verify – they’ve not yet responded.

 

Well, that was fun!

It was a pretty exciting day. It was cold and it started with stretching an indoor activity. It wasn’t long before River, my lab, and I hit the trails to run. By then, it had warmed to a toasty 28°F.

There are some big mushrooms in these woods. (My shoe is a size 10 for reference)

For sure, I’ve run when it has been colder. When I lived in Cleveland during the winter temperature around 0°F wasn’t uncommon. Still, I got up and ran.

Lake Erie in the winter

Running here, back home in Georgia, temperatures are as rough in the winter. Heading out on single track or animal trails through the woods is plain fun.

But, archery outside in 28°F isn’t a lot of fun. You just don’t work up enough internal combustion to stay warm. Wearing everything you own to stay warm while practicing is too cumbersome for me. The other night, after league shooting, a fellow and I were heading to our vehicles. It was around 8:20 PM and already getting cold. He bragged about the temperature not being cold to he – being from Boston and all.

For seven years I had an office in Boston, I lived in Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Baltimore. I worked for extended periods of the winters in Sweden. In all of those places, I ran in the morning before work. I understand cold. Spend a winter or two in Uppsala, Sweden and Boston winters seems cute.

Uppsala, Sweden

After running it was off to Ace Hardware is Social Circle, Georgia to use their indoor range. Yep, Ace has an archery pro shop and very nice indoor range. They are also the major sponsor for an archery club, where I am a member, in this area.

Mornings at the hardware store archery range often mean the early risers can have their choice of lane to use. I try to get to the shop as soon as possible. I’m never entirely alone, other shooters come in, fling some arrows, and leave. As a rule, I do have a solid place to practice away from the cold.

Perfect for winter practice

On this morning I used a new target after the first 50 or so arrows. I moved it higher on their archery butt to take some time shooting the top target with a bit more elevation. On my second end on this new target I screwed up.

My shoulders were all wrong, my anchor felt off, my peep had rotated, so I needed to let down and start over. As I was becoming aware to let down I blinked. It seemed that something hit me in the eye. Naturally, with my eyes closed and my braining thinking, “Ouch” the arrow launched away.

All I could do was wait to here the arrow crash into the wall above the target. But, that’s not the sound I heard. I was lucky I heard the arrow hit the archer butt.

Looking for a five at best I didn’t immediately notice the arrow. Looking off the target entirely I still couldn’t find the arrow. Then, no, that is too lucky – the arrow hit the X. Not only hitting the X but it couldn’t have landed more perfectly. It was probably a one in a million shot.

The top arrow, eyes closed, the arrow got away, but seems like a well trained arrow

The weather “person” promised rising afternoon temperatures. So, after the morning at 18-meters I hoped to practice at 25-meters in the forecasted warmth. Sure enough, after a short cold afternoon bike ride, the temperature peaked into the 40s. On top of that, my new target arrived.

The sad, old, poorly repaired, block targets on my range could no longer do their jobs. Sure arrows slowed down, but there was no stopping them. I’d resorted to shooting a bag, which isn’t a great butt for a 3-spot. On the bag I use a vertical 3-spot is too long and the Vegas style target has only on sort of flat target. It was time for a new butt.

Target are expensive. It is one of the items on which I hate spending money. I know that before long the purchase by using it will end up wasted. You can shoot a bow over and over, you can use arrows over and over, but anything you shoot an arrow into eventually is gone.

What I’d been looking at for a replacement cost over $300. The same item was available on Amazon for $260. Amazon also had another brand that was a little smaller, a few inches, but a third the price. I figured for around $100 I’d take a chance.

In this case, that chance paid off. The target is very high quality as good as or better than the more expense products. The bonus is that it arrived about 30 minutes before I was planning to practice 25-meters.

Found on Amazon for around $100. It is heavy, 70 pounds.

During 25-meter practice daylight began to fade. The range is on a cleared area in the woods behind our house. In those woods, off not too far, I could hear coyotes howling. Usually, I’ll carry at least a pistol with me on the range; particularly in the summer as defense against rattlesnakes and copperhead. During winter months I don’t always bring a pistol. Those coyotes were too close for comfort even though I had a bow.

The coyotes marked the end of a fun day. There was running and riding and shooting. Granted, it was all part of training to do well in archery, which is sort of like a fun job.

Archery Fans’ Signs

In my current issue of Runner’s World magazine they had an article that pictured lots of signs held by fans lining marathon courses. Marathons were never my favorite distance. I only ran them to train for Ironman races where we had to run a marathon after swimming 2.4 miles and cycling 112 miles. A single event like a marathon was essentially a fun way to train.

All marathons are different. The distance remains the same but each race is unique. The distance isn’t the only constant; there are always thousands, if not tens of thousands of fans watching the race. At the Tokyo marathon a few years ago (yes Japan) the course was literally packed with fans. The noise was incredible. Like all the other marathons I’ve run Japan had another constant of the race – fans with signs.

I couldn’t read the Japanese signs. For the most part I couldn’t understand what was being said around me. I had the same problem racing or training in Italy, Germany, Switzerland and Belgium. Usually, I’d find someone that spoke English and that person was a prize. But, in every race, no matter where, there were signs.

I love that about sports, that fans come out and watch us suffer while often providing a bit of humor is wonderful. That is except for archery.

I did a search for signs by fans of archery. I found one. Apparently the Koreans are less inhibited than other fans and produced signs in support of their champion Park. (I can’t show it. The sign, while available in the public domain, came with a copyright warning.  Typical.)

Signs for runners aren’t necessarily going to support a champion, at least in the sense of the race winner. They support runners in general or a runner in specific. My wife, Brenda, at the Ironman World Championship on Kona, Hawaii, drew me a sign on the road with chalk. I hadn’t known she’d done it but I saw it. It was a small thing in the grand scheme of a lifetime together but I haven’t forgotten the gesture.

There may be a sign or two at major archery tournaments, but they have eluded my search. I think fans with signs supporting their favorite archer is a good thing and it is sad we don’t see them. I think it is great when fans of a sport make and hold up signs that are non-athlete specific and are meant to support everyone.

Some signs I read along a racecourse have stuck with me and I was thankful to have read them. Of course, archery judges or more stoic observers of the sport might not welcome some of the signs held up by rabid running or triathlon fans should similar signs migrate to archery.

Still, I remain in favor of fans enjoying archery even if enthusiastic ones held signs over their heads that might be a distracting to serious minded, stone faced, fans, competitors and officials of the sport. For me, the signs have always been refreshing and welcomed.

Time to Give the Senior Division a Shot?

As 2019 approaches and tournaments begin to open there is the matter of which division to shoot. A goal, when I started shooting a bow, was to migrate from the Masters division to the Senior. That move would be based on my scores. (In archery Senior is the group between 21 and 49 years old.  Masters are over 50 years old.)

Archery is one of two sports where age isn’t a tremendous factor. For example, if I were training for a triathlon the consideration to compete against a 25 year old would be out of the question. In archery I compete against opponents less than half my age all the time. However, I’ve not yet made the shift to a younger group in any major event.

At the moment I am preparing for the USA National Indoor Championship. I’ve not yet entered – entry for my area isn’t available at the moment. In the meantime we have a 25-meter State Championship in ten days time. I’ve entered that as a Master.

My rolling average is creeping toward 600

The internal debate of Senior versus Master Division is a matter of confidence. I suppose it can’t be truly earned by simply comparing scores. It will come from head to head competition and a bit of guts.