Clearing woods and pitiful archery

Moving is more than simply having one house loaded, moved to the next, and then unloaded. Although, that is a major task, there are all sorts of landscaping that needs to be done on our property.

We have three acres of thick forest behind our backyard. Our “backyard” has now been fenced and sodded. But, the land beyond the fence is practically impenetrable it is so thick. There are a couple of old trails that pass across the land, but other than those passages navigation is a challenge.

The new 18-meter set-up

This land is where I want to put a 3D range. I’d, also, like a place for picnics and short hikes when the grandkids come to visit. To have that means clearing the land. After three days of hacking and chopping I was beat.

This patch wasn’t too bad
Targets waiting for a home on partially cleared land

On top of the clearing work I’ve been trying to run every morning, shoot after running, then hack, chop, and pull, eat lunch, get on my bike in the afternoon then chop some more and finally get in a second archery practice. Let me tell you, that kind of work and archery do not mix – at least for me.

Tools for the job

 

This section is starting to open up

By the end of the third day it was all I could do to lift my bow. That night I joined a local archery competition and shot horribly. The next day I hired a crew to help with the land clearing. I’d found my physical limit.

Wonder if any body is home?

38 Hours

We’re nearly all packed for our move to Georgia. The movers load our furniture and boxes on Friday. They can’t get our “stuff” to us until the 22nd through 24th of January. Really bad timing for archery.

We’d anticipated being in our new home by the end of December. Hurricane Irma put the builders behind schedule. The time infringement is now on archery practice and a few major archery tournaments coming up in February. Oh well, that’s how it goes.

We’re still in our house here in North Carolina for the next 38 hours or so. There’s not a dish unpacked. We’re eating off the china we in our Winnebago for camping. Today, 100% of my archery equipment was packed. I shot three arrows at 18-meters before I disassembled my bow – hit a 10 and two nines. Yesterday, when no one was noticing I slipped away for a decent practice. But, that’s it for a while.

Hopefully, I can get some practice in while we’re in Georgia waiting to moving into our new house. We’ll be staying with our daughter and her family until our “stuff” arrives. She’s only 10 miles away from the new place. And she’s close to Ace Archery in Social Circle. There may be a number of, “Has anyone seen David?” “No, and his truck is gone,” moments while we wait out the arrival of our possessions.  Then, there’s bond to be a, “Where have you been,” inquiry.

The house here still hasn’t sold. We had two offers this past week but both were too weak to accept. The second was close and we referred a counter offer to the potential buyer.

Until it sales, I plan to continue to come back and forth in the camper and enjoy some trips to the Little River and the Outer Banks. Who knows, if it isn’t too much of a burden to make the drive we may just keep North Carolina house as a vacation home. It is why we bought it in the first place.

In the meantime, I am anxious to get archery practice back on track.

 

This moving stuff

Getting a new house is exciting. Getting one that we don’t have to immediately renovate is nice. Here’s the thing, before we’ve set foot in the door we’ve changed ceilings, customized closets, had kitchen plans modified, added trim work everywhere inside the house, changed the driveway, and picking out everything from flooring to roofing. The past few days we’ve hired someone to build a custom shed on the property, found a fence guy, and met with a landscaper to work on the 3D range.

The landscaper was a lucky find. He’s also an archer. He’s not the landscaper that is currently doing our landscaping. Both are archers. The current guy is too busy. The new guy, Andy is our new next-door neighbor. As such, a lucky find.

The other landscaper guy told me he was so busy he had no idea when he might have time to help design my 3D range. However, he mentioned that there is a free 3D range just 15 minutes from our new house. Needing a break from spending money I decided to search for this free 3D range.

Certainly uninteresting shots but good for judging yardage.

I found it. In fact, it is only 15 minutes from my house. But, it is simply 3D targets set up on a range. It’s not 100% free. You need to have a Georgia DNR Hunting license. So, aside from that fee, which I pay anyway, I’m good to go on the DNR range.

Today wasn’t the day to test the free range. It was too cold and windy.  Still hoping to shoot my bow on the round trip home, I stopped at Ace Hardware Social Circle. Now where I wrote ‘home’ I am referring to my daughter’s house in Watkinsville. We’re staying with her while we add a few finishing touches to our house in progress.

Oh, I can’t wait to shoot this big fellow.

In Social Circle Ace is the Place to shoot indoors. It was nice to get some practice. On this trip, we left about 10 days ago; I’ve only gotten in three practice sessions. Today made the fourth. On a more positive note, running is above par and cycling is just below on my current training plan.

Trying to compensate for some loss of hours training, running and riding were on today’s agenda along with archery. Running and riding in the cold really takes it out of me. I’ve been asleep since I began writing this post.

Talent Transfer

It was not my intention to be competitive in archery. It was only suppose to be a backyard pastime. Then, I read, “Faster, Higher, Stronger: The New Science of Creating Superathletes, and How You Can Train Like Them” by Mark McClusky.

In his book McClusky writes there are two sports where an athlete over 50 can be an elite: shooting and archery. He further writes about talent transfer and the 10,000 rule. Looking into this with more depth archery became a sport wherein I decided to become competitive.

The first order of business, aside from getting a bow, some arrows, and such, was to determine if that 10,000 hour rule could be broken by a 59 year old cyclist/triathlete turned archer. There also needed to be a measure of where that might be properly evaluated.

The measure I selected as a goal was equivalency in cycling. At my best, as a cyclist I won State Road, time trial and sprint Championships in the same year. In 2017 in archery I won State Indoor, Outdoor and 3D Championships. It took less than 48 months to achieve those objectives in archery. It did not take 10,000 hours.

The 10,000 hour rule is based on what judges might say is a summary of the time it take anyone to became an elite performer. I do not have 10,000 hours of archery practice under my belt. Because I’ve some championships does that mean I’ve broken the 10,000 rule to become an elite performer in archer? Simply, no.

Look at three archers considered elite: Brandon Gillenthien, Jesse Broadwater, and Reo Wilde. Their last published scores for 120 arrows at 18-meters comes to an average score of 1183 or 1190, 1190, and 1170, respectively. My best score for 120 arrows at 18-meters in 1158 or 2.1% lower than the elites’ average over one event where they competed. While 2.1% doesn’t look like a lot it is a huge difference – 25 points. It is this variance that separates me from an elite based strictly on score.

Cadel Evans, mountain biker (photo from:http://www.treadmtb.co.za/cape-epic-2017-day-6-tread-notes-observations/)

The next question is how long will it take to close that 25-point gap? As a rule, I generally know how many arrows I shoot per year. I have not kept hours of practice logged but do have a rough estimate of 1250 hours per year. Along with the 10,000 rule this matches the eight-year rule. The eight-year rule says it takes eight years of deliberate practice to become an elite. At my current rate of practice I should reach the elite level in 2020. However, my improvement percentage change year on year has me reaching the scoring level for elite status late 2018 or early 2019.

Cadel Evans, Tour de France Champions (photo:http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/cadel-evans-the-legacy-of-australias-greatest-rider/)

What I have learned is that Talent Transfer from cycling, for example, to archery has only minor advantage. The main benefit is focus on training. In cycling there are a lot of long hours on the bike. In archery there are a lot of long hours on the range. Beyond that, the sports are so dissimilar that there is little crossover. It certainly isn’t like being a mountain bike rider that crosses over to road racing as in the case of Cadel Evans winner of the Tour de France (2011) and Olympic Mountain Bike racer (9th place Atlanta 1996).

Mountain Biking, Shooting and Ditching (Not in that order)

Ditching was first on the agenda. Not my agenda, River’s agenda. If you haven’t been a reader here you might not know who is River. River is my Labrador Retriever. I’ve not met a Lab that doesn’t love the water. River is crazy about water.

It rained hard here in Georgia yesterday. Every ditch and creek was brimming with water. River runs with me and this morning we headed out to run a trail we discovered yesterday. Knowing of a ditch that pools with water along the usual run I decided to avoid that direction. I was pretty sure we could get to the new trail a back way. It was an attempt to keep River out of the rain off ditch pool.

River has been smelling a bit ‘above bad’ having had a bath last week. It would be nice if she’d not stink when we’re visiting family. Were here in Georgia visiting family for Christmas. River doesn’t often have ‘nice’ wafting off of her coat. If she goes ditching (Ditching: jumping into a water filled earthy conduit and running as hard as possible) there is going to be stink.

It’s not that she’s naturally stinky. She works hard to reach an apex of olfactory funk. Rather than chance she’d jump into an overflowed ditch that forms such a tempting pool of water we headed in the opposite direction. That didn’t end up as planned.

The run put us at trails that simply called us forward. After nearly an hour of running it was becoming clear we were heading around a wide weaving circle. In the back of my mind a worry suggested we’d come out of the woods at a point where the pool would be between home and us. I considered turning back figuring that might add another 45 minutes to the run. That time would eat into archery practice. We remained on course. Plus, I wasn’t really up for nearly 2 hours of trail running.

It turned out my worry wasn’t unfounded. Once we cleared the woods my fragrant neutral dog hopes dimmed. Within two tenths of a mile there was the pool of rainwater. River was only 10 yards ahead, 30 yards from the water. She stopped as soon as she spotted her wet reward. Slowly she turned back toward me, gave dog grin and made a beeline for the ditch. I sprinted toward her and with increasing volume ordered her to stop. The louder I got the faster she sprinted.

River is a big girl at 105 pounds. She is all muscle. It always amazes me how much water she can displace at full tilt. There was no avoiding the bath to come. I did save time by not circling back only to lose it washing a dog.

Nevertheless, I got a decent ‘afternoon’ archery practice shooting at a 5-spot. The morning archery session was blown to washing River. I’d switched over from a 3-spot for a break. Since August 2  of this year every 5-spot practice has yielded a 300. But, if you shoot 5-spots a lot you know the X count is where the money waits. Only 47 X’s today. Frustrating.

The archery frustration was burnt off during an afternoon riding mountain bike. I wanted to follow the same trails we ran this morning only heading right rather than left (I already knew that was a wide circle) at a Y intersection.

At that point the trail begins to climb. Looking down at my Garmin I noted the mileage at the foot of the climb. That climb went on for one mile. The earlier rain made the path, having a base layer of red clay, one slippery exercise in staying upright and moving forward. Despite the greater than anticipated elevation in heart rate, to match the unforeseen length of the climb, it was a nice way to end the day. That and of course no broken bones or cuts.

Running and Shooting and Waiting Out the Rain

We’re back in Tignal, Georgia for a few days before we had off to Athens for Christmas. River and I hit the road before it rained. Man, has it rained. Running was pretty nice. First of all there was no rain. Secondly, there were lots of trails and double track to cruise.

Running along the sides of country roads isn’t bad primarily because we have minimal traffic. Getting totally off road is even better.

After an hour of trail running it was looking more and more like rain. Needing to get some archery practice in, having missed yesterday when we drove to Georgia from North Carolina, it was a rush to stay ahead of the guaranteed downpour.

This is a blast on a mountain bike

Both running and archery (at least the morning archery practice) were completed. Cycling and a second day’s archery practice now await cessation of rain.

The rain is easing off

A Year of Improvement

This competitive year 2017 is done. An easy stat to look over from the years 2015 – 2017 is a 3-spot. I’ll crunch the 5-spot numbers as well as 3D scores. But, a 3-spot is a primary marker. It’s primary because it is controlled, unlike 3D, and more frequent as opposed to a 5-spot.

3D is harder to analyze because for variances of yardage, size of target, weather, distance, and whether or not the competition was ASA or IBO. Five-spots competition has simply not occurred for me since I moved from Maryland. Even then, those were league scores and the distance was 18- yards rather than 18-meters. I still shoot at a 5-spot fairly often, but not as frequently as a 3-spot.

Three-spot shooting is pretty well controlled and I have the scores recorded in competitive events as well as practice. I do have more 3D tournament scores in general and I’ll look over those next. No matter how it reasons out; 3-spot is an easy analysis as a starting point.

The results of the number crunching  shows on average a 10-point improvement each year starting in 2015 though 2017. There’s a 1.75% increase in score per year. Not quite 2%.

Performance-wise I have a hopeful anticipation of a 3% increase in 2018 followed by a 1% to 2% increase in 2019. ( a 3% increase will put my average scores in the 590 range.)

Knowing how I finished out the 2017 archery season is an important marker for setting realistic 2018 goals.

Snipers, Zen, Fitness and Hitting the X – Response for Jack

A good friend of mine, Jack, frequently reads my posts here at Putting it on the Line. He has often sent me a comment after reading; he is kind enough to rarely make editorial comments. As a writer I know there is “No pain or passion that exceeds on man’s desire to edit another man’s manuscript.” (M. Twain) So, I am indebted to Jack’s restraint.

Jack may not be an endurance athlete, but he is a serious sailor.

A few weeks ago after reading “The Mental Game in Archery” he sent me a some note that got me to thinking. Jack has always made me think. Some folks can just think, I have to work at thinking.

So, here’s Jack’s note from November 16th :

“A very interesting perspective. I know absolutely NOTHING about endurance sports, and even less about archery. I understand quite clearly your well thought out self-analysis, and two questions come to mind. Both are multiple part questions.

  1. Roughly how many archers of your caliber are also endurance athletes? Since the disciplines between your two arenas of effort are so different, can you seek (or glean from casual conversation) advice from others like you?
  2. (Not really a question, just some thoughts) While you mention relaxing between shots, you describe more self-analysis than relaxation. Everything I have ever read about the top snipers describe that they enter a Zen like state to reduce any undue mental influences on their stillness and aim. Have you explored this path?
    I’m not one to advise you, but sometimes we are so close to an issue, a fresh perspective may help.

Just sayin.”

Regarding question number one – I don’t know. Probably not many. I do know of couple of archers that are endurance athletes. One is a triathlete and was once the Virginia State ASA 3D Champion. The other is an ultra-marathoner. She is an amazing runner and shoots bare bow. She is a better runner than archer. Neither successfully mingled the disciplines.  By success I mean both today have dropped either archery for exclusive running or doing a little of each as a past time.  Which is certainly fine and in itself is success depending on goals.

There is also Cameron Hanes who is an extremely fit athlete and professional bow hunter. Mr. Hanes has competed runs like the Boston Marathon and even 100-mile runs. But, Mr. Hanes is not a competitive archer. Although, I’d bet he’s making more money than 99% of all professional archers.

I don’t know other archers that might be considered fit enough to suggest they are endurance athletes. My guess is that the percentage is extremely low among the entire population of archers with that percentage dropping inversely with age.

As far as advice to archers that are not physically fit – find a fitness plan and use it. In the near future I’ll be adding one to my website. Only wish I was as smart as Cameron Hanes and could get paid for it.

Regarding your second question –  I do work toward being calm when I shoot. However, I remain a distance away from Zen-like calmness even when sleeping. As far as Zen goes and snipers, well I asked a sniper.

It just happens that we have a sniper in the family. (I am leaving his name out of this as a precaution) It took a few weeks to get to him because he has been deployed. He got home on Thanksgiving Day and heads back on December 17th.

Here’s what he said about his shots and Zen:

“Most of my shots were within a 100 meter range – half of which were quick, reactive engagements.  I was at Camp Shark Base in Ramadi with Chris Kyle in 2006, and this is when he began to transition away from much of the “sit and wait” type shots he had in Fallujah (2004) like in the movie. The scenario that most envision of a sniper spending days in a hide sight to shoot one shot from a mile away… I’ve never done that. “

“There was definitely no “zen like” moment.  Only on a couple of occasions would I have the luxury of deciding when the shot was going to take place, like if we needed to take out a sentry before moving closer.”

This may take some of the ‘glamour’ away from what most people think of snipers. Those comments are from a Ranger sniper. His work is like this:

“The scenario typically goes like this; we have a target, we either do an ‘offset infil’ a click away (so they don’t hear the birds), or we land right on top of it.  My spotter and I would usually set up on the “black side” (the back of the objective).  We usually get on a rooftop as close to the objective as possible.  We have an IR strobe on to identify us as friendlies.  Some time we even watch alternate breach points to neutralize maneuvering elements once the charge went off. “

My relative also added, “To be honest, a sniper in the ‘big Army’ usually has a lot more cool stories.  SOCOM (United States Special Operations Command)  has so many assets at their disposal that they rarely need snipers to kill people.  But if you talk to a sniper in the 3rd ID during 2005 – wow.  They did some shit.”

Regarding how much practice he got, I did want to know how many rounds he used in practice realizing that only 10% of the Army’s best shooters make it to sniper school. In other words, most snipers are good shots when they get there.

His response was, “I’d probably shoot 5,000 rounds through it. (‘it’ being a 6-month rotation D.L.) That’s just a rough figure though – of course you also have to spend time on your other weapons systems too, and there’s so much more than shooting.  In fact, shooting is only 10% of it – maybe less.”

Granted, a relaxed state, (Jack – alpha wave brain activity) is beneficial for excellent archery. Some folks equate that to a Zen-like meditative state. Certainly, I work to achieve a calm state of mind. I have that luxury compared to a sniper since no one wants to kill me.

Here the rub, in a tournament you have so many arrows to shoot in a very limited time. You must learn to be comfortable and confident with your shot in seconds. If you took a minute seeking a Zen-like state for each arrow you’d run out of time. So, you practice getting perfect shots within a limited time. I often use a stopwatch in the same manner a quarterback uses his 25 seconds to get off a play. You have to learn to feel the time since you can’t stare at the clock during a competition.

Did anyone see where that arrow landed?

Regardless, in order for that to work an archer must have years of practice. That is applicable in any sport. You can’t take a Zen monk, place a bow in his hand and expect him to shoot X after X after X. It’s not his frame of mind that creates flawed shots. A target bow is heavy. It takes a lot of conditioning to hold the bow, draw an arrow, hold it steady for about 8 seconds and release the arrow. All of this without swaying while you extend an eight-pound bow that’s resting on your hand (no not being gripped by the bow hand).

After looking into Jack’s questions, I think the most important factors in good archery are: confidence, attitude and practice.

Cycling and Training on a Computrainer

(This is not about archery. It’s regarding cycling and training. The abstracts below are linked if you’re into sports physiology and medicine.)

This is about the Computrainer by Racermate. It is without doubt the best training tool I’ve ever owned. I’ve had the one I use for over two decades.

My set-up

It’s a product I purchased originally for research. At that time I was studying oxygen desaturation during maximal effort among elite cyclists. (1) A decade after that initial study I repeated it and found the same result. (2) The abstracts are linked below and both appeared in peer-reviewed journals.

One of the many data screens

The device is a trainer connected to a computer. The name “Computrainer” isn’t much of a leap. I actually have a dedicated computer and leave everything connected including one of my bikes. As you might image, there is a wealth of physiologic data that can be collected from the Computrainer. In my research I added more diagnostic devices and discovered some cool stuff, which is included in one of my patents stemming from the research.

I use this screen a lot

These days, I’m not doing data collection. I use the decades old Computrainer for its primary purpose, for training. What is gives me is enough live data to keep pushing. It also let’s me ride courses, like the Ironman Hawaii (which I did yesterday). It is an excellent way to enjoy long hours in the saddle while not going anywhere.

Virtual cruise on the Queen K in Hawaii
200 Tour de France on another screen

During long sessions, I’ll add a video, yesterday’s was the 2000 Tour de France, and watch that as I ride. It does help the time pass. The Computrainer remains unparalleled as a training tool. There have been days I chose to ride it rather than going outside. A bonus is no cars being driven have phone addicted drivers to contend with.

You’ll notice it is dark outside – it was only 5:15 PM.

Reference:

1.) Lain D, Jackson C: Exercise induced hypoxemia (EIH) desaturation zones: a use or athletic training. Chest, Vol 118, No. 4, page 203S, 2000. Lain, David, and Chris Jackson. “EXERCISE-INDUCED HYPOXEMIA (EIH) DESATURATION ZONES: A USE FOR ATHLETIC TRAINING.” Chest, Oct. 2000, p. 203S. Academic OneFile, Accessed 14 Dec. 2017.

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?id=GALE%7CA71127451&sid=googleScholar&v=2.1&it=r&linkaccess=fulltext&issn=00123692&p=AONE&sw=w&authCount=1&isAnonymousEntry=true

2.)Lain, DC, Granger W: Oxygen saturation and heart rate during exercise performance. Anesthesia and Analgesia

https://www.stahq.org/files/1813/5845/7616/18_Lain2_Abstract.pdf

(Click the site above – this has neat color graphics. Check out the wattage the elite cyclists cranked out over a 10 mile course)

A Great Day to Play

The weather was great, today. Sunny with very little wind and not too cold. It was a good day to train.

For the 2018 Duathlon National Championships I’m using a modified triathlon training plan. There’s no swimming in a duathlon so those workouts are replaced with more running. It’s no big deal since running is a daily activity pretty much regardless of a formal training plan. In other words, I’m not running too much.  This is a modified plan that I’m following so there is flexibility.

There are lots of sport training plans available for purchase. There are an ever-growing number of coaches for hire through the Internet. What they offer are programs available to you sight unseen. Perhaps, if you are new to a sport an online coach you never see can provide a starting point. After decades of sports, in my opinion a face-to-face coach is a better investment. I’m making no investment. I took a plan I’d created years ago and adapted it for the upcoming race.

I’ve had some great coaches in cycling, football, and track. I’ve also spent decades studying sports physiology and feel fairly confident I can put together a plan that will get me across a finish line. Of course, there are the hours of work that need to be completed and today was ideal to add to those hours.

In an abridged overview my general training goes like this: Run, shoot, rest, shoot, cycle, and sometimes run again. It was hard not to do a second run today, the weather being so nice. It was the archery practice that pushed me away from a second run.

The second practice with a bow was going just fine. Well, good enough for second practice. That session was planned for 60 arrows at a 3-spot followed by 30 at a 5-spot. The morning was just 60 arrows into a 3-spot.

The afternoon 3-spot when okay with 32 Xs and 28 nines. Sure, Reo Wilde doesn’t need to be worried for the moment. But, not too bad. Then, I put up a 5-spot.

Man, those X rings looked huge on that blue and white paper. I shot 10 arrows and called it a day. As big as the X is on a 5-spot I was doing good to hit white. It was time to stop. While I didn’t feel tired, my arrow placement suggested otherwise. It also indicated I’d had enough exercise for the day, so not second run. Instead, a hike in the woods was perfect to wind things down.

Tomorrow the weather isn’t going to be so nice. I’ll have to go into Elizabeth City to shoot. I’m glad there is an indoor range within a 40-minute drive. Still, I am looking forward to moving to Georgia where on days like tomorrow promises to be, that drive becomes 15-minutes.